Posts Tagged ‘Ronald D. Moore’

The Syfy Channel’s 2010 Upfront Event In Photos

March 20, 2010

ON March 16th, 2010, some of the Syfy Channel’s brightest stars joined network executives and invited guests for Syfy’s Upfront Event at New York’s Museum of Modern Art to help the channel celebrate its ratings success as well as promote several upcoming projects for the 2010-2011 broadcast season. Below are some photo highlights from the gathering. Enjoy! 

Warehouse 13's Eddie McClintock and Joanne Kelly. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

  

Sanctuary's Amanda Tapping. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Eureka's Salli Richardson-Whitfield and Colin Ferguson. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Destination Truth's Josh Gates and Eureka's Colin Ferguson. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Stargate Universe's David Blue and Ming-Na. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Ghost Hunters' Amy Bruni and Kris Williams with Destination Truth's Josh Gates. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Caprica co-creators/executive producers David Eick and Ronald D. Moore. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Caprica's Magda Apanowicz, Sashi Roiz, Alessandra Torresani and Esai Morales. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Stargate Universe's Ming-Na and Sanctuary's Amanda Tapping. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Haven's Emily Rose and Stargate Universe's David Blue. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Caprica's Esai Morales and Sasha Roiz. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Destination Truth's Josh Gates, Sanctuary's Amanda Tapping and David Howe, President, Syfy. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

As noted above, all photos by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any kind. Thanks!

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Patton Oswalt Cast in Syfy’s Caprica

August 17, 2009

THE Syfy Channel has announced that celebrated comedian Patton Oswalt will guest-star on its highly-anticipated series Caprica, premiering January 22nd, 2010. Oswalt will play the role of Baxter Samo, the wildly popular Caprican comedian talk show host on whose show Daniel and Amanda Graystone (Eric Stoltz and Paula Malcomson, respectively) ultimately appear.

Humanity’s storyline takes completely new twists with Caprica, which follows two rival families and their patriarchs – Daniel Graystone (Eric Stoltz) and Joseph Adama (Esai Morales) – as they compete and thrive in the vibrant realm of the 12 Colonies, a society recognizably close to our own. This original, standalone series will feature the passion, intrigue, political backbiting, and family conflict in an omnipotent society that is at the height of its blind power and glory…and, unknowingly, on the brink of its fall. Caprica also stars Paula Malcomson (Amanda Graystone), Polly Walker (Sister Clarice Willow), Magda Apanowicz (Lacy) and Alessandra Torresani (Zoe Graystone). The series is from Universal Cable Productions and executive produced by Ronald D. Moore, David Eick and Jane Espenson. Jeffrey Reiner (Friday Night Lights) directed the pilot.

As a comedian, Oswalt has released three TV specials and two critically acclaimed albums. This month, his one-hour Comedy Central Special, My Weakness is Strong, will premiere on air as well as on DVD/CD through Warner Bros. records. Patton tours regularly and extensively, headlining both in the United States and the UK. A regular at music festivals like Bumbershoot, Bonaroo and Coachella, he has also made the jump to theaters, as well as performing/reading at events by McSweeney’s and The Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. He has a regular bi-monthly show at the new Largo at the Coronet Theater in Los Angeles, and was also a regular fill-in host for Steve Jones on the nationally syndicated Jonesey’s Jukebox on Indie 103.1.

A versatile performer, Oswalt has also appeared in more than 20 films including Magnolia, Starsky and Hutch and Reno 911!: Miami, and provided the voice for Remy the Rat in Pixar’s Oscar-winning Ratatouille. Later this month, Patton will make his dramatic debut on the big screen as Paul Aufiero in Big Fan, the directorial debut of writer Robert Siegel (The Wrestler). Oswalt will also appear in Steven Soderbergh’s feature film The Informant, and recently appeared in Observe and Report with Seth Rogan.

His many television roles include Spence on The King of Queens on CBS for nine seasons as well as appearing on Seinfeld, Reaper, Aqua Teen Hunger Force and Tim and Eric’s Awesome Show, Great Job! Oswalt is also recurring again on the second season of Showtime’s The United States of Tara. He is a regular contributor to Countdown with Keith Olbermann, Real Time with Bill Maher and Lewis Black’s Root of All Evil.

Battlestar Galactica Named Program Of The Year By The TCA

August 3, 2009

THIS past weekend, the Television Critics Association (TCA) recognized The Syfy Channel’s epic series Battlestar Galactica with the award for the Program of the Year in a ceremony held August 1st at the Langham Hotel and Spa in Pasadena, California. Battlestar Galactica took the top prize after ending its four season run this past March as one of television’s most raved-about shows.

The 25th annual TCA Awards honored the finest work of the 2008-09 season as selected by the association’s 200+ member critics and journalists.

Battlestar Galactica is the gripping saga of humanity’s last remnants and their struggle to find a new home while fleeing from their deadly Cylon enemies. Redefining the space opera with its gritty realism, Galactica‘s intensity, issues-driven topicality, and command performances have garnered it numerous awards, including two Emmys and the prestigious George Foster Peabody Award. The show was recognized by the American Film Institute (AFI), and for two years running was one of the most outstanding programs of the year. The series is from Universal Cable Productions and executive produced by Ronald D. Moore and David Eick.

Caprica Premieres In 2010 On The Syfy Channel

July 27, 2009

SYFY has announced the air date for its highly-anticipated upcoming series Caprica. On Friday, January 22nd @ 9 p.m., the show will kick off with a two-hour premiere and will air regularly on subsequent Fridays @ 10 p.m.

Humanity’s storyline takes completely new twists with Caprica, which follows two rival families and their patriarchs -Daniel Graystone (Eric Stoltz) and Joseph Adama (Esai Morales) – as they compete and thrive in the vibrant realm of the Twelve Colonies, a society recognizably close to our own. This original, standalone series will feature the passion, intrigue, political backbiting, and family conflict in an omnipotent society that is at the height of its blind power and glory…and, unknowingly, on the brink of its fall.

Caprica's Eric Stoltz (Daniel Graystone) and Alessandra Torresani (Zoe Graystone). Photo by Evans Ward and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Caprica's Eric Stoltz (Daniel Graystone) and Alessandra Torresani (Zoe Graystone). Photo by Evans Ward and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Esai Morales (Joseph Adama) with Caprica writer/executive producer Jane Espenson. Photo by Evans Ward and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Esai Morales (Joseph Adama) with Caprica writer/executive producer Jane Espenson. Photo by Evans Ward and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Caprica also stars Paula Malcomson (Amanda Graystone), Polly Walker (Sister Clarice Willow), Magda Apanowicz (Lacy) and Alessandra Torresani (Zoe Graystone). The series is from Universal Cable Productions and executive produced by Ronald D. Moore, David Eick and Jane Espenson. Jeffrey Reiner (Friday Night Lights) directed the pilot.

As noted above, photos by Evans Ward and copyright of The Syfy Channel, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any form. Thanks!

Sienna Guillory & Clea DuVall – Virtually Speaking

June 26, 2009

THIS Friday, June 26th (8 p.m. – 1o p.m. EST/PST),  Fox will broadcast Virtuality. Ronald D. Moore (Battlestar Galactica, Star Trek: The Next Generation) wrote and executive produced with Michael Taylor (Battlestar GalacticaStar Trek: Voyager)  this two-hour movie (and backdoor pilot) in which a space crew sets out on a 10-year journey through outer space in order to save an unsustainable Earth, their actions being telecast to a worldwide audience as part of a reality TV show. To help pass the time on their long journey, their ship is equipped with virtual reality modules, but tensions soon mount as a glitch in the system unleashes a virus onto the ship.

Earlier this week, myself and several other journalists spoke via a conference call with actresses Sienna Guillory and Clea DuVall, who play exo-biologist Rika Goddard and ship’s pilot Sue Parsons, respectively, in Virtuality, about their work in the movie. The following is an edited version of that Q & A session.

Clea, you’ve been in so many different genre projects and played a variety of characters; what type of preparation do you do in order to get into the various roles. And how do you approach each of these different types of characters, where you always seem to be able to put it all together and knock it [your performance] out of the ball park?

CLEA DuVALL – That’s very sweet of you to say, thank you. I approach each role differently. On Virtuality, for me, it was about getting to know the people that I was working with and becoming comfortable with improv, which is something I’d never done before. However, [director] Peter Berg likes to work that way; he just sort of lets scenes run and watches what happens. So it was a lot of on-the-job training with this one, and any preparation I did had to be thrown out the window if you will, and it was a matter of putting my trust in Peter and my fellow actors.

Sienna, I know that a lot of the work that you guys did, especially when your characters were in the virtual environments, was green screen-type work. What were some of the challenges of that?

SIENNA GUILLORY – I think in a way, when you’re working with green screen, it’s hugely enabling. In this case, it was the whole thing that Ron Moore came up with. By that I mean in Virtuality, he gives our characters lives with no limitations, so you have to use that green screen as a plus. The fact that there’s nothing there to limit your imagination or where you see yourself or how you see the scene unfolding can be a helpful thing. So you just imagine it exactly the way you want it to be, rather than kind of being held back by the physical limitations of a set.

Each of the crew on the ship has his or her own virtual reality – what was each of yours?

CD – My character was very much into outdoor sports, so bike-riding, surfing, etc.

SG – My character is actually an exo-biologist, which is kind of extreme gardening on a molecular level. But she’s trapped in this passionless marriage to the ship’s psychologist, so she uses her virtual module to fantasize about sex and intimacy.

Given that our world seems to be increasingly moving towards one that is dominated by virtual reality, how do you think that will impact our emotional and psychological well-being as reflected in your characters in the movie?

SG – In terms of how it worked in the show, we’re geeks, but we’re still people, we’re still humans. So anything that happens to us in our own personal movies happens to all of us, because we’re stuck together. Again, the whole point of it is that Ron Moore is providing these characters with a life without limitations, so I think it’s tremendously healthy to be able to explore your inner cravings and all the things that you dream of and be able to realize your fantasies without necessarily hurting other people. At the same time, you also need to realize that when you do experience something emotionally, it does affect who you are, and I think that’s the backbone of what we’re doing. What happens in our virtual modules affects everyone around us, even though we think our experiences are private.

Given that this story was meant to be an ongoing one, were there any details that you were given or that you asked for going forward about your characters?

CD – There were little bits and pieces that we were given because I think we all had the hopes that it would continue. But they, Michael and Ron, didn’t really give away much. I think that we were all under such pressure to just do what we were doing, that thinking into the future was overwhelming at the time. However, there is definitely a lot more to the story that, fingers crossed, we may be able to tell.

SG – We had times where we’d all gather around and discuss these kinds of “mad” notions that maybe our characters aren’t actually on the ship. Maybe they’re in these little pods being fed these ideas. That the whole thing is a virtual simulation and one day they’ll all wake up and find that they’re actually not where they think they are.

Going back to the improvisation mentioned earlier, having done genre, effect-heavy type work before, what difference does the improvisation make in that [type of] environment?

CD – I think for me, whenever I’m doing any kind of genre, it’s all improvisation, because you don’t know. I don’t know what’s going to happen until I get there, so in that way I guess it [Virtuality] was similar to other things I’ve done. But with this, I’ve never had so much freedom with the script. I mean, of course I said everything that was in the script, but being able to then build on it and create more and find things that I didn’t even know were there until we were doing it was very exciting. Everyone was so good at that, and it really shows onscreen.

SG– I agree. The creative imaginative geniuses that are Ron Moore and Mike Taylor are so infectiously enthusiastic as well as  so brave. They assumed that the audience was intelligent and demanding, which made us as an ensemble want to rise up and meet the challenge. So when we were actually filming, they lent us that bravery and allowed us to inhabit these roles and just let rip with whatever crazy idea came into our minds, with the safety net of knowing that they were going to take out the bad bits. So that was the freedom and the great thing about working on this.

CD – And also them trusting us so much and being people that we, in turn, respected and trusted. I think that also gave us the confidence to trust ourselves and sort of go with whatever our instincts were telling us.

Can you tell us how you first became involved in this project and about the audition process for your role?

SG – I read the script and thought it was one of the best things I’d ever read. I put myself on tape – I was in London at the time – and then they said they liked it. So I flew over to the U.S., did the studio test that night, and then the next morning I did the network test and that was it.

CD – I received the script and thought it was one of the best scripts I’d ever read as well. I had to go on the audition the very next day and it was terrible. I couldn’t remember my lines, I was stuttering. It wasn’t cute. However,  they asked me to come back the next day and try again, which I did. This time I went in with a little more focus, and then they had me test for the role. I ended up getting the job and I was very excited.

BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION:

Sienna Guillory – Named one of the “100 Sexiest Women” by Maxium Magazine, Sienna Guillory transcends physical beauty as a British-born actress of broad range and nuance. She is beginning production on Gunless, which is slated for release in March 2010. Guillory plays Jane opposite Paul Gross and Dustin Milligan. Her latest film is Inkheart starring Helen Mirren, Brendan Fraser and Paul Bettany. In 2006, the actress starred in the Fox 2000 film Eragon as Princess Arya opposite Jeremy Irons and John Malkovich. Also recognized for her role in the romantic comedy Love Actually starring Hugh Grant, Colin Firth, Liam Neeson and Emma Thompson, Guillory first grabbed the attention of audiences with her breakout role in the 2002 Science Fiction film The Time Machine opposite Guy Pearce. On the small screen, the actress was recently seen on Criminal Minds. She also made an impression on critics and audiences as the star of the 2003 miniseries Helen of Troy. Originally from Kettering, a small town outside London, Guillory began her career as a model, landing campaigns for brands such as Hugo Boss, before making the transition to acting.

Clea DuVall In a relatively short span of time, Clea DuVall has burst onto the scene and quickly become one of Hollywood’s most sought-after talents. One of the few actors working successfully and simultaneously in film and TV, her resume is both extensive and versatile. DuVall first gained recognition in the independent feature How to Make the Cruelest Month, which was one of 16 films in dramatic competition at the 1998 Sundance Film Festival. Later that same year, her starring role as the rebellious loner Stokely in The Faculty garnered her Blockbuster and Teen Choice Award nominations for Breakout Performance. DuVall was most recently seen in Jonathan Liebesman’s The Killing Room, which premiered at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival. Prior to that, she could be seen in Passengers, directed by Rodrigo Garcia with Anne Hathaway and Patrick Wilson. Her additional film credits include Zodiac, the American remake of The Grudge, Girl Interrupted and The Astronaut’s Wife. On TV, DuVall’s credits include Grey’s Anatomy, Heroes, Carnivale, ER and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Born and raised in Los Angeles, she first became interested in acting while attending the Los Angeles High School of the Arts. During her time there, the actress performed in the theater and also took acting classes outside of school. Upon graduating, she quickly landed an agent as well as a manager and has been working nonstop ever since.

Ron Moore – Virtual Vision

June 24, 2009

ABOARD Earth’s first starship, the Phaeton, a crew of 12 astronauts is on the verge of embarking on an epic 10-year mission crucial to the survival of life on Earth. They have reached the “go” or “no go” point, the critical part of the journey where the crew must commit to traveling to a distant solar system millions of miles away. If they “go,” they cannot turn back.

Executive producers Ronald D. Moore (Battlestar Galactica, Star Trek: The Next Generation), Michael Taylor (Battlestar Galactica, Star Trek: Voyager) and director Peter Berg (Friday Night Lights, Hancock) present Virtuality, a breakthrough Science Fiction thriller set in two very different universes: outer space and the seemingly limitless virtual reality.

To give the crew a measure of privacy as well as a vital recreational outlet on the long journey, the ship has been equipped with revolutionary virtual reality modules. Each crew member can assume adventurous, avatar-like identities as they explore self-created worlds and scenarios, or simply spend quality downtime as themselves in the ultra-life-like simulators From a war hero to a rock star to secret lovers on an island, these are their psychological lifelines, and each module’s unique setting was chosen by the crew member before departing Earth.

But there is a bug in the system.

As crew members go in and out of reality, they realize that a virus has entered their private world. Questions are raised, and suspicions fanned; is someone on the crew responsible? When the interloper’s intrusions cross a violent and disturbing line, the ship’s commander makes a difficult decision to shut down the modules. But before he can, a tragic even threatens the mission. Is it an accident or a crime? Real or virtual? Whatever the case, it’s too late to turn back, so the group ventures forth into space, fearing that they may be harboring a person or presence determined to derail their vital mission. Meanwhile, tensions are further heightened as surveillance cameras capture their every move for a reality series back on Earth.

From executive producers Ronald D. Moore, Michael Taylor, Gail Berman, Lloyd Braun, Peter Berg and Sarah Aubrey, this captivating original feature invites viewers to join the crew of the Phaeton on a journey into a near-future, one that is a heightened version of our own Internet- and entertainment-mediated reality. A journey that will become even more surprising with each new revelation.

The cast of Virtuality, which airs Friday, June 26th from 8 p.m. - 10 p.m. EST/PST on the Fox Network. L-R: Kerry Bishe (as Billie Kashmiri); Ritchie Coster (as Dr. Jimmy Johnson); Eric Jensen (as Dr. Jules Braun); Nelson Lee (as Kenji Yamamoto); Joy Bryant (as Alice Thibadeau); Clea Duvall (as Sue Parsons); Nikolaj Coster-Waldau (as Commander Frank Pike); Sienna Guillory (as Rika Goddard); James D'Arcy (as Dr. Roger Fallon); Jose Pablo Cantillo (as Manny Rodriguez); Gene Farber (as Val Orlovsky); Omar Metwally (as Dr. Adin Meyer) and Jimmi Simpson (as Virtual Man). Photo credit: Kharen Hill/Fox and copyright of Fox Broadcasting

The cast of Virtuality, which airs Friday, June 26th from 8 p.m. - 10 p.m. EST/PST on the Fox Network. L-R: Kerry Bishe (as Billie Kashmiri); Ritchie Coster (as Dr. Jimmy Johnson); Eric Jensen (as Dr. Jules Braun); Nelson Lee (as Kenji Yamamoto); Joy Bryant (as Alice Thibadeau); Clea DuVall (as Sue Parsons); Nikolaj Coster-Waldau (as Commander Frank Pike); Sienna Guillory (as Rika Goddard); James D'Arcy (as Dr. Roger Fallon); Jose Pablo Cantillo (as Manny Rodriguez); Gene Farber (as Val Orlovsky); Omar Metwally (as Dr. Adin Meyer) and Jimmi Simpson (as Virtual Man). Photo credit: Kharen Hill/Fox and copyright of Fox Broadcasting

Earlier this month, myself and several other journalists participated in a Q & A conference call with Virtuality writer/executive producer Ron Moore. Here is an edited version of that conversation.

How is this [Virtuality] different from Star Trek where you would have the holodeck and people would get lost in that artificial environment?

RON MOORE – Well, it’s a different concept. The holodeck was an actual space that you would go into and three dimensional forms were physically created in front of you, which you were then able to feel, touch, interact with, etc. The computer would generate them as long as you were in there. This, however, is truly a virtual space, which is much more akin to putting on contemporary, sort of virtual headsets, but then taking that to the next level where you do have an experiential ability to touch, sense, taste and smell things in your mind, so it’s on a different mechanical level.

In terms of story, we’re not playing the idea that if you die in the virtual space, you then die in real space. It’s more like gaming is now. You go on-line, play a game and if you get killed, then you’re kicked out of the program, but you’re not dead in real life. We’re using these [virtual reality modules] much more psychologically as well. Essentially, the virtual experiences that the astronauts have aboard the Phaeton are the types of things that are psychologically motivated. They go in there and do things for entertainment and to pass the time of day while they’re on this very, very long-range mission. In the process, you’re also learning things about them personally as well as where they choose to spend their time, and when things go wrong inside that space how does that then influence them in the real world. That was the thing I was most interested in; how virtual space impacted the real story that was going on aboard the spacecraft and vice versa.

Given the nature of Battlestar Galactica, you had to be very serious dealing with the spaceship and everything. Does Virtuality allow you to have a little bit more fun with the concept of people in space?

RM – Oh, yes. It’s a much less serious situation than Battlestar dealt with. Battlestar was literally a post-apocalyptic show where the future of humanity rode on their every decision, and death was stalking them continuously. This [Virtuality] is not set up in the same way. The crew on-board the Phaeton signed up for what just seemed like a very straightforward mission of exploration and they were chosen with that in mind. They were also chosen to participate in this sort of reality show that is being broadcast back on Earth.

So there was a conscious attempt on the part of the people who put the crew together to have  an interesting mix of people. There are debates amongst the crew itself when it comes to who was chosen just for their demographic content as opposed to who is legitimately supposed to be there. Now you’ve got a group of 12 people stuck in a metal tube going in a straight line for a decade or so, and that’s going to result in a lot of tension, friction and manipulation, and cause problems between the characters. It has a strong element of fun and suspense and interesting plot twists in terms of what characters will do with one another. Battlestar, on the other hand, was very much driven by the internal pressures of the huge weight that was on all of their shoulders from the beginning of the miniseries. So there’s definitely more humor. Let’s just say that in the first 10 minutes of Virtuality there is probably more humor than there was in the [entire] run of Battlestar.

When did you come up with the idea of blending a Sci-Fi thriller with a reality show element to it?

RM – It was sort of in stages. When we first started talking about the concept it was about a long-range space mission, which I was intrigued with. Like I said before, I was interested in the idea of what do you do with 12 people in a metal tube for that long. I thought there were interesting dramatic possibilities right there and, OK, what would they realistically need to do. What would NASA or the space confederation do at that point to keep them from going crazy? They would probably have a really advanced virtual reality program to help them pass the time, and there’s interaction between those two worlds.

Somewhere in those discussions, we began talking about when they would be broadcasting pieces back to Earth, like astronauts do today, and, hey, what if they made a reality show out of that? Then it all kind of started to come together. You had these three layers of storytelling going on in the show where you had what was happening in the real world on the ship, what was happening in the virtual space, and then what was the reality show that was seen back on Earth. Were the needs of the reality show starting to impact what was happening on the spacecraft? Were people being manipulated in order to make better drama for the reality show? So it evolved into this really interesting psychological crucible that our characters would all be put in.

When you were writing this were there any major hurdles or blind alleys? Did it get confusing?

RM – Yes. I mean, it was a tough thing to juggle. It’s a very ambitious piece, and I think that was the reaction on the part of Fox when they saw it. It’s a very challenging, complicated piece of work and there are a number of moving parts. We knew that going in and writing the script wasn’t easy. There was a lot of trying to decide how much time to spend in any one of these three categories, and at what point do you shift from the audience’s point of view to the other. What’s the language for that? Where are we going to introduce certain characters? How often do you go to the first person confessionals and the reality show, etc. So there were several complicated questions, all of which were still there in the editing process. When do you switch to which piece of material? I found it all a fascinating challenge.

In the virtual world are there avatar-style characters or are there real people?

RM – The actors play themselves in the virtual space. What we did during the production was shoot all of the virtual reality scenes using green screen. So for instance, the story opens with an extended piece that involves the lead character within a Civil War virtual space. None of that was shot on-location, and we didn’t build a set, either. It was all done on a green screen stage using a computer. We kept that language for all the virtual pieces to give them all a sense of continuity so that you always felt that you were in a virtual space.

This was originally supposed to be a pilot for a TV series, right?

RM – It is a pilot. Fox is going to broadcast it as a two-hour movie, but in my mind it’s a pilot and it always has been.

So it can still become a series?

RM – I think you never say never. It hasn’t been picked up yet. The network’s attitude is, I think, to kind of wait and see what the reaction is going to be. What are the critics going to say? Is it going to get word of mouth. Are fans going to gravitate to it or is the Science Fiction community really going to turn up for it? Is there going to be a certain buzz and excitement? Right now it doesn’t look like it’s going to series, but I think if enough people watched and got excited about it, then anything is possible. It [the story] certainly does not resolve itself in two hours. Some pretty heavy things go down in it, and by the end of it you’re kind of left thinking, “Whoa! Where is that going?”

Why do you think people have become so obsessed with reality TV? What is the attraction to it? What made you want to include it in this particular story?

RM – The first two questions are kind of complicated and I’m not sure what the answers are. At first, I think I was one of those skeptics who doubted that reality TV was going to be with us for any great length of time. Certainly that has been proven wrong. There seems to be a fundamental interest of real people watching other real people, or at least what they perceive to be real people, as opposed to watching fictional programming. There’s a powerful draw there of us wanting to look in on other peoples’ lives and seeing them pretty much exist as they actually do.

As for why we’ve included it in Virtuality,  we just felt like it’s become such a staple of pop culture at this point in time. It seemed interesting to then incorporate it into a Science Fiction setting, which was something that we had never seen before or heard of. We’ve all seen video that’s been broadcast back by the astronauts from the Apollo missions to the Space Shuttle, but we’ve never seen it done in a format where it’s trying to be a reality show. I thought it was kind of a different hook for the audience and might be a cool angle for our story.

What do you think of the network climate right now, especially in light of Terminator being cancelled and Dollhouse having been on the cusp? It seems like anything complex aimed at a younger audience has a really hard time staying on.

RM – Well, I think it’s a difficult time for the networks in general, and scheduling kind of reflects that. Everybody in this business has a sense that television is changing right underneath our feet, and while we all say, “Yes, we’re going to be ahead of the curve and we know that TV is changing,” no one has an idea of what it’s changing into. It’s that sort of anxiety and lack of knowledge about where TV is headed that contributes to the overall atmosphere of fear and panic where networks are saying, “Oh, my God, this didn’t work. We can’t afford the time to stick with this show. We gave it four episodes and that’s it.”

And that’s unfortunate because many of the most successful shows on TV had rocky starts and really required networks that believed in the process and were willing to stick by them. For example, they really had to believe in Seinfeld, and it turned out to be not only a critical hit and one of the great comedies of all time, but also incredibly lucrative. So there’s certainly a strong argument for having patience along with faith and really trusting your audience as well as your instincts and going with programming.

And here are some closing remarks from Ron Moore.

There is a series of webisodes that were created for Virtuality. These webisodes, however, are not just your traditional here’s an extra piece of story that you didn’t see on the show, and here’s another little segment to tease you. These webisodes for Virtuality are actually segments of the reality show within the show itself, so in theory, when you logged onto the website, what you would see when you clicked on webisodes would be pieces of the reality show as it was broadcast back to Earth. That was in our original pitch to the network. We said, “Everyone is always looking for this sort of interaction between the broadcast show and driving people to the website.” It’s always been sort of an uncomfortable marriage and they never quite seem to marry up in an interesting way for the audience. Ours had this sort of organic way of doing that where you could go to the website and experience Edge of Never, which is the name of the reality show.

The concept and the plan would have been if the pilot went to series, that every week you could log onto the website and see pieces of the reality show. And buried within those pieces would be actual information and clues that would not be accessible to the people watching the broadcast of the show. There was going to be a deliberate effort to sort of say, “Really, if you want to get all of what’s going on and to even crack some of the underlying mysteries to what this series is about, then you have to go and watch these pieces of Edge of Never.” There is, in fact, a Facebook page for Edge of Never, and I would encourage people to go take a look at it because I think it’s a unique bit of Virtuality.

As noted above, the Virtuality cast photo is copyright of the Fox Network, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any form. Thanks!