Posts Tagged ‘Eric Roberts’

Heroes’ Jack Coleman – Noah’s Arc

May 3, 2010

Jack Coleman as Heroes' Noah Bennet. Photo copyright of NBC

Heroes‘ Noah Bennet (a.k.a. Horn-Rimmed Glasses or H.R.G.) seemed to have it all – a comfortable home, a loving wife and children, and a steady job with Primatech Paper Co. Most people, however, had no idea he was living a double life and that Noah’s actual work involved tracking down and imprisoning evolved humans for a mysterious organization known as The Company. 

His daughter, and an evolved human, Claire, eventually finds out her father’s secret, and in the show’s third year, Noah’s wife Sandra and son Lyle discover that he is now doing the same type of work for the U.S. government. Sandra decides to leave Noah, who, at the end of the season, helps “kill” one of the most dangerous evolved humans ever, Sylar, or so he thinks. 

In the season four opener Orientation, he is asked to once again help get rid of Sylar, who is, in fact, still alive, but Noah refuses. Meanwhile, his own life is in danger from Tracy Strauss, who uses her ability to control and freeze water to try to drown him in his car. That scene turned out to be quite a memorable start to the season for actor Jack Coleman, who plays Noah. 

Noah and Tracy Strauss (Ali Larter) - unlikely allies. Photo by Adam Taylor and copyright of NBC

“I did another interview where I mentioned that the [fourth] season starts as well as ends in a flood for Noah, so there is a nice symmetry to it all for me and my character,” muses Coleman. “That scene in Orientation got my attention as soon as I read the description of it in the script, which was something like, ‘H.R.G. gets into his car, turns on the ignition and the car is flooded with water up to and then over his head, then cut to commercial.’ 

“I thought, “Is H.R.G. going to live? It’s going to be interesting to see what happens.’ They [the show’s producers] had already told me that this scene was coming, and the actual shooting of it was a lot of fun as well as challenging and one of those things you get to do on a show like Heroes that’s just really cool. They had these big hoses coming into the car vents, and literally on the cue of my turning on the ignition, the water gushed into the car. It came in with such force that it knocked my glasses off, and in 10 or 15 seconds the car interior was filled with water. 

“So it was very intense, but a blast. They took good care of me, too, and I was never in any danger.” 

Almost being drowned is just a small part of Noah’s life being turned upside-down at the start of Heroes‘ fourth year. Now living alone, his wife divorcing hm and his daughter Claire (Hayden Panettiere) trying to start a new life for herself  at college, this onetime “company man” has reached a personal as well as professional crossroads. Noah begins to reevaluate what is and what is no longer important to him, including his involvement with evolved humans. This was a side of his character that Coleman enjoyed having the chance to explore. 

Noah's life begins to take some unexpected turns in "Orientation." Photo by Justin Lubin and copyright of NBC

“I liked the idea of redemption and H.R.G. taking stock of his life and deciding that all the time he’s been bagging and tagging [evolved humans], he hasn’t really helped others very much,” says the actor. “I was curious to see where that would go and I think it’s kind of cool that by the end of the season he does get to help other people without shooting them or in any way harming them. 

“As for Noah’s and Sandra’s divorce, again, I’d heard that that would be happening, and I was surprised that it was essentially a fait accompli when the season starts. I thought it was going to unravel as we went along, but basically it had unraveled and the writers had done that pretty well last year where Sandra could no longer trust Noah. You get to a point where you stop giving someone another chance, and she had reached that point with Noah, and understandably so. 

“I always liked the family unit and I loved working with Ashley Crow [Sandra Bennet]. I think it made a certain amount of sense just in terms of mixing things up from season to season and focusing on a guy like Noah, who thought he was doing all this for his family and to protect them. When, however, you take that family away, you get to see who he really is and the soul-searching that my character has to do. I think that’s what’s been different this year for me. 

Noah and Sandra Bennet (Ashley Crow). Photo by Justin Lubin and copyright of NBC

“At the beginning of the season, Noah found himself in a fairly quiet, reflective, contemplative place. He was trying to figure out if all the years of rationalizing why he has been doing all this really added up to anything meaningful. And I think he finally realized that it did not. A leopard can’t change its spots and Noah is who he is, but at least there’s room in him for growth and self-examination, which I enjoyed having the chance to do this season.” 

Despite Tracy’s (Ali Larter) efforts to drown him, Noah is saved by Danko (Zeljko Ivanek), a former senior government agent who he worked with when hunting evolved humans. Noah and Tracy later meet, and she tells him that he is one of the former “Company” employees who she has vowed to kill. He then does something, though, that changes her mind about him, so much so that the two join forces to save another evolved human named Jeremy Greer (Mark L. Young) in the season four episode Strange Attractors

“I liked that early on there was a very wary but slowly building friendship between Tracy and Noah,” says Coleman. “Obviously she was very suspicious of my character, and because she had the ability to kill him at any time, he was wary of her as well. In Orientation, Noah saves Tracy from Danko with some help from Jimmy Jean-Louis’ character of The Haitian, who erases Danko’s memory of Tracy so that he is no longer chasing after her. 

Danko (Zeljko Ivanek) and H.R.G. in the episode "An Invisible Thread." Photo by Trae Patton and copyright of NBC

“About three episodes into season four, things between Tracy and Noah begin to thaw, to the point where he calls on her to go with him to this town to try to save this kid, Jeremy. The episodes leading up to that were pretty dark as well as a little disturbing, and Mark Young, who played Jeremy, was great in the role. I just remember there being some very intense scenes, several of which we shot at night in that town. Prior to this I hadn’t worked much with Ali Larter, and I enjoyed getting to do that.” 

In the Heroes‘ fourth season episode Ink, Noah is surprised to find that Claire’s college roommate Gretchen (Madeline Zima) knows about her regenerative powers. When he suggests that The Haitian erase Gretchen’s memory of this, she refuses, telling Noah that she will handle it. Claire longs to lead a normal life out in the open, so much so that she considers an offer by Samuel Sullivan (Robert Knepper), the leader of a travelling carnival, to join his group of evolved humans. Unbeknownst to Claire, he has an ulterior motive, but Noah is looking out for his daughter and resolves to bring Samuel down. 

“It was interesting to watch the way that Samuel woos Claire to come join his carnival and find a new family and be able to live openly,” notes Coleman. “That was all very appealing to her, but then you realize that he’s not telling the whole truth. Samuel comes out and says, ‘It’s not really Claire that I’m after,’ and I think that’s when he’d made up his mind to make my character the fall guy in the grand plan that he has. 

Noah Bennet and his daughter Claire (Hayden Panettiere), an unstoppable father/daughter team! Photo by Adam Taylor and copyright of NBC

“Noah already has this reputation of hunting ‘specials’ [evolved humans], so in the episode The Art of Deception, Samuel sends Eli [Todd Stashwick] up into the hills above the carnival and has him shooting at his own kind, which he blames on my character. As a result, all of Samuel’s people coalesce around him, and it suddenly becomes apparent that this was his intention all along – to lure H.R.G. to the carnival and set him up as his straw man in order to rally the troops all around him. 

Art of Deception was directed by S J Clarkson, this wonderful English director who we’ve worked with now a couple of times. It was almost all night shoots and it was hard on everybody because we were outside and it was getting cold and there was a ton of rain. So it was a tough one to shoot, but our director did a great job. I thought that Lydia’s [Dawn Olivieri] death was nicely handled and I loved the kiss that Samuel gives her. In doing so, he lets her know that he’s orchestrated this whole thing. It’s a macabre scene because as she lies there dying, Samuel is essentially telling Lydia that he’s been deceiving her. There is some sadness to it, too, and a really good set-up for the next couple of episodes.” 

Claire discovers a great deal about her father’s past, including his reason for agreeing to work for The Company, in the penultimate season four episode The Wall. This story also has Peter Petrelli (Milo Ventimiglia) and Sylar (Zachary Quinto) trapped in a telepathic world of Matt Parkman’s (Greg Grunberg) making. 

Noah, Claire and Peter Petrelli (Milo Ventimiglia) in "Upon This Rock." Photo by Chris Haston and copyright of NBC

“Allan Arkush directed The Wall, and he was a director as well as executive producer on Heroes for the first three seasons,” says Coleman. “He directed [season one’s] Company Man, among other episodes, and Allan came back to direct this one. So it was a pleasure to work with him again, and I got to do all the flashback scenes where I was a little nervous about looking like David Hasselhoff in Knight Rider,” jokes the actor, “but those scenes ended up being both appropriate and looking good. 

“Flashback scenes like that are always challenging because you’re supposed to look 28 years old again, and that isn’t always easy. We shot everything in black and white and I got to work with Eric Roberts [Thompson], which I thoroughly enjoyed. Then we had all the scenes in the House of Mirrors where Damian [Harry Perry] shows Claire all these bits of Noah’s past. This is Samuel’s last ditch effort to bring her over to his side, which, of course, fails. 

“I also thought the scenes in The Wall with Zach and Milo were really good. It’s impressive any time you have downtown Los Angeles or any downtown metropolis vacated except for the last two people on Earth. When I first read the script I wasn’t sure whether or not all that passage of time was going to come across and if you’d really get a sense that these guys felt like they’ve been trapped in this world forever. All that played out incredibly well and Zach and Milo did some terrific stuff together.” 

Things will never quite be the same for Claire and her father as they enter a "Brave New World." Photo by Chris Haston and copyright of NBC

Towards the end of The Wall, Samuel traps Noah and Claire in a trailer and uses his ability to manipulate geological materials to sink it deep below the Earth. Although Claire’s lungs will regenerate over and over, Noah will eventually suffocate and die. Lucky for them, Tracy comes to their rescue in Heroes‘ fourth season finale Brave New World

“One of my strongest memories from that episode is the flooding that you see come our way,” recalls Coleman. “As I said before, there’s the symmetry of almost perishing by water at Tracy’s hands in the season opener, and then being saved by water at Tracy’s hands in the season finale. The thing that sticks with me the most, though, are all my scenes with Hayden in the souvenir trailer, which is supposedly buried 40 feet blow the Earth’s surface. The two of us spent several days working in this little trailer on a gimble; it was dark, dusty and dirty, but we had some really amazing scenes, and Hayden is just so good in them.” 

When Heroes debuted, H.R.G. appeared on the surface to be one of the bad guys, and while the show’s writers as well as Coleman could have easily focused on that, they instead chose to dig deeper. “One of the true joys of playing this character is that he is multifaceted, and there’s been a lot of development with him,” says the actor. “Noah was a true believer when we first met him. He was a company man and sold on The Company’s mission and what he was doing. He could justify anything and took a great deal of pleasure in his sometimes dirty work. 

Noah calls on Tracy Strauss for help at the end of Heroes' fourth season. Photo by Adam Taylor and copyright of NBC

“As time went on, my character began to question The Company and what it was up to and what it was going to do. Then, however, by the first season episode Company Man, you see it all really pivot. You suddenly know for sure that Noah has actually been trying to hide and protect his daughter rather than harvesting her or whatever other theories people out there had, because no one was quite sure what his intentions were. At that point, though, I think you realize without a doubt that Bennet really does love his daughter as well as his family and is trying to keep them safe. 

“Then he goes on the mission to try to bring The Company down, and that leads into the second season and all that betrayal at the hands of Suresh [Sendhil Ramamurthy],” continues Coleman. “So Noah goes from true believer in The Company’s work, to trying to bring it down, and then just doing his best to keep a low profile and out of sight. In season three, he’s essentially forced into doing all this work for The Company to keep it off his family’s back. They try teaming Noah up with Sylar and do all these other kind of crazy things that bring him back to his old hunting days, but he’s doing it under duress in order to keep his family safe. So you see him kind of careening back and forth between family man to secret agent to man without a country where he’s on the lam and he can’t trust anyone. 

“And in season four, again, he takes stock of everything and tries to figure out whether or not what he’s done has amounted to much. Noah comes to the conclusion that it hasn’t. As I said, it’s hard for the leopard to change his spots. There are parts of my character that will always be Machiavellian. He’s always going to have claws and fangs and remain a dangerous person. But I think that Noah has gone from being a man with very little conscience, to someone with a conscience who actually tries his best to help people.” 

Noah and Suresh (Sendhil Ramamurthy) in the episode "1961." Photo by Adam Taylor and copyright of NBC

There has been no official word yet if Heroes will return for a fifth season this fall, but if all goes well and it is renewed, what are Coleman’s hopes not only for his character but also the series as a whole? 

“That’s a good question, and a tough one,” he says. “I’m not entirely sure that I could tell you where I’d like Noah to go and where I want the series to go. I don’t have a pat answer and would have to think long and hard about that. 

“I do think that the series is in its comfort zone or sweet spot if you will, when it keeps its focus squarely on characters and relationships and have the story develop from there. Keeping our characters consistent, which we got back to this season, and seeing them making their decisions justifiable and understandable is, again, extremely important. And I think they’ve done a very good job of that this year. We’re probably going to need a new big bad, and you see at the end of this season’s finale that Claire leaves little doubt as to who and what she is. The episode is called Brave New World, and so what happens in this brave new world when she essentially outs herself along with everybody else who has these powers. It’s pretty fertile ground for storytelling, and I’ll leave that up to those with the word processors.” 

Reluctant "co-workers" Sylar (Zachary Quinto) and H.R.G. in season three's "Angels and Demons." Photo by Adam Taylor and copyright of NBC

Heroes is just the latest entry in Coleman’s long and varied list of acting credits. Longtime fans will remember him as Steven Carrington in the hit ABC nighttime soap Dynasty. Other work includes roles in such series as Nip/Tuck, CSI: Miami, Without a Trace and Entourage as well as a number of made-for-TV movies and feature films. The actor has managed to maintain an ongoing presence in front of audiences over the years, which is not as easy at it sounds. 

“This industry is tough and it’s getting tougher, and as you get older it gets a million times tougher,” explains Coleman. “The availability of jobs and the outlook for continued employment is far greater if you are in your twenties or thirties then it is when you’re in your fifties. So the fact that Heroes and such a great character like Noah came along at a time in my career where I could have easily just gone out to pasture is incredibly rewarding. It’s also been a show that I’ve really enjoyed doing and with people who I enjoy working with. 

“When these unexpected things come out of nowhere, you say to yourself, ‘Wow, it can happen again,’ and it can happen at a time when you least expect it. The thing is, though, you need to really keep working at it and kind of refuse to go away. I think it was Woody Allen who said, ‘Ninety percent of it [acting] is just showing up.’ So persistence has a great payoff, and being able to keep a career vibrant and viable at a time when it’s very easy for it to dry up is one of the great joys of this industry.” 

Steve Eramo 

As noted above, photos by Adam Taylor, Trae Patton, Justin Lubin or Chris Haston and copyright of NBC, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any kind. Thanks!

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The Syfy Channel’s 2010-2011 Original Movie Line-Up

March 25, 2010

DURING the 2010-11 season, the Syfy Channel, one of television’s most prolific producers of original films, presents a talent-rich Original Movies line-up showcasing stars such as Hill Harper (CSI NY), Eric Roberts (The Dark Knight), Sean Bean (Lord of the Rings), Lauren Holly (NCIS), Colin Ferguson (Eureka), Isabella Rossellini (Blue Velvet), Jewel Staite (Stargate Atlantis), Alan Cumming (Tin Man), Felicia Day (Buffy the Vampire Slayer), Ryan Carnes (Desperate Housewives, Doctor Who), Lance Henriksen (Aliens) and Barry Williams (The Brady Bunch).

Movies include Riverworld (previously reported on SciFiAndTvTalk), starring Alan Cumming in an epic adventure based on the award-winning series of Philip Jose Farmer novels; The Phantom, and 24 of the popular Stargate Original Movies, including Red, a re-imagining of the Little Red Riding Hood story starring Felicia Day, Roger Corman’s Sharktopus, starring Eric Roberts (also previously reported along with Red on this blog) and Lake Placid 3 – sequel to the most watched Saturday Original Movie ever (Lake Placid 2). Below are some highlights of these upcoming projects.

The Phantom – Four hours, premieres in June – Ryan Carnes stars as The Phantom and his alter ego Chris Walker in this re-imagined version of the classic comic strip transported to present day. A favorite costumed hero for more than six decades, The Phantom relies on his wits, physical strength and skill with weapons instead of superhuman powers. Isabella Rossellini guest-stars in a villainous turn as Lithia, the head of an experimental mind control program. Also starring are Cameron Goodman as Chris Walker’s love interest, Renny, and Sandrine Holt (24, The L Word) as The Phantom’s trusted advisor, Guran. Director: Paolo Barzman (The Last Templar). The Phantom is produced by Muse Entertainment and RHI Entertainment.

Mega Piranha – Premieres Saturday, April 10th @ 9:00 p.m. EST/PST. An unusual alliance tries to stop a mutant strain of giant ferocious piranhas that have escaped from the Amazon and are eating their way to Florida. Stars Barry Williams, Tiffany and Paul Logan.

Mothman – Premieres Saturday, April 24th @ 9:00 p.m. EST/PST. The legendary West Virginia monster returns to exact revenge on five childhood friends who covered up an accidental killing. Stars Jewel Staite.

Mongolian Death Worm – Premieres Saturday, May 8th @ 9:00 p.m. EST/PST. A treasure hunter who has been searching for a tomb containing Genghis Khan’s treasure teams up with an humanitarian UN health worker to stop the Mongolian Death Worms, awakened by experimental oil drilling in the Mongolian desert. Stars Patrick Flannery and Victoria Pratt.

Witchville – Premieres Saturday, May 22nd @ 9:00 p.m. EST/PST. This first Syfy production in China is a sweeping fantasy tale of a kingdom besieged by witches who are sucking the very life out of the land. Only the new King can save his people, but his mysterious connection to the Red Queen of the witches may be his undoing. Stars Luke Goss.

Lake Placid 3 – In this sequel , a game warden, his wife and their young son move into their aunt’s cabin on Lake Placid, where the lonely boy stars feeding baby crocodiles he views as pets. Three years later, the crocs start looking at him and his family as their food. Stars Colin Ferguson.

Stonehenge Apocalypse – When the giant stones of Stonehenge begin to move and cataclysms occur all over the Earth, only a fringe radio talk show host who’s an expert in UFOlogy figures out that the ancient monument is really alien technology. Stars Hill Harper, Misha Collins and Peter Wingfield.

The Lost Future – In a post-apocalyptic world, both humans and animals have devolved back to the Stone Age. But a small group of wise men knows there is knowledge in the mysterious artifacts called books. Now they have found a young man who knows how to read. If they can defeat the warlord who rules the city where the books are kept, the young man can help them defeat the disease that decimated the world and restart the civilization. Stars Sean Bean.

Scream of the Banshee – An archeology professor unearths a dangerous relic, releasing a creature that can kill with her bone-splitting scream. Stars Lauren Holly and Lance Henriksen.

Morlocks – An experimental time machine opens a window into the future and mutated monsters (the Morlocks) use it to come back to the present and go on a murderous rampage. Stars David Hewlett (Stargate Atlantis).

8th Voyage of Sinbad – Sinbad searches for the golden head of the long lost Colossus of Rhodes and, instead, finds an island where the mythical Minotaur still rules, protecting a vast treasure. Sinbad and his crew have to battle the creature and its minions to get the treasure and save their own lives. Stars Manu Bennett.

Eric Roberts Stars in Sharktopus On The Syfy Channel

March 17, 2010

Eric Roberts as Thompson in Heroes. Photo by Chris Haston and copyright of NBC

ACADEMY Award and Golden Globe nominee Eric Roberts will star in the highly anticipated new Syfy Saturday Original Movie Sharktopus, produced by cult movie legend Roger Corman, scheduled to premiere later in 2010. Already the talk of the Internet, Sharktopus is about a research scientist (Roberts) and his talented daughter who develop a secret military weapon – a hybrid shark/octopus that can be controlled by electrical implants. But when the controls break down, the monster goes on a killing rampage at the resort beaches of Mexico.  

Eric Roberts received Golden Globe nominations for his starring roles in King of the Gypsies (1978) and Star 80 (1983). He was nominated for the 1985 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role as the escaped convict Buck in the film Runaway Train. In 1987, the actor won the Theatre World Award for his Broadway debut performance in Burn This. Roberts’ other starring roles include Raggedy Man, The Pope of Greenwich Village, Nobody’s Fool, Final Analysis and A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints. He appeared in The Dark Knight as Sal Maroni, a Gotham City Mafia boss who hires The Joker (Heath Ledger) to kill Batman (Christian Bale). On TV, Roberts has co-starred in the ABC sitcom Less Than Perfect, along with appearances on HeroesCSI: Miami, Law & Order: SVU and The L Word. He also played The Master in the 1996 Doctor Who TV movie.  

Roger Corman, who received an Honorary 2010 Oscar, is the legendary director and producer of numerous low-budget cult classics, among them It Conquered the World, Teenage Doll, The Little Shop of Horrors, House of Usher, Pit and the Pendulum, Premature Burial, The Raven, The Masque of the Red Death, The Wild Angels and The Trip. Corman is also credited with opening the door to a number of young filmmakers, including Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, James Cameron, Jonathan Demme and Ron Howard.  

Sharktopus is produced by Roger Corman and Julie Corman, and directed by Declan O’Brien (Wrong Turn 3, Cyclops, Monster Ark, Rock Monster).  

As noted above, photo by Chris Haston and copyright of NBC, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any kind. Thanks!

Doctor Who: The End Of Time On BBC America

December 22, 2009

Wilf Mott (Bernard Cribbins), The Doctor (David Tennant) and The Master (John Simm) in Doctor Who: The End of Time, Part One. Photo copyright of the BBC

THE final two Doctor Who specials, Doctor Who: The End of Time, Part One and Part Two, starring David Tennant as The Doctor, will premiere over the holiday season on BBC America. In Part One, it’s the Tenth Doctor’s final journey, but his psychotic nemesis, The Master (John Simm), has been reborn on Christmas Eve. With both determined to cheat death, the battle ranges from the wastelands of London to the mysterious Immortality Gate. Meanwhile, the alien race Ood, warn of an even greater danger approaching, as a terrible shadow falls across the entire Universe. 

It's the beginning of the end for the Tenth Doctor (David Tennant). Photo copyright of the BBC

Guess who's back???? John Simm as The Master! Photo copyright of the BBC

In Part Two, the Doctor faces the end of his life as the Master’s plans hurtle out of control. With the sound of drums growing louder and an ancient trap closing around the Earth, the Doctor and Wilf Mott (Bernard Cribbins) must fight alone. But sacrifices have to be made, and the deadly prophecy warns, “He will knock four times.” 

Bernard Cribbins as Wilf Mott (Donna Noble's grandfather). Photo copyright of the BBC

This is not Bernard Cribbins’ first journey aboard the TARDIS. The veteran British TV, feature film and stage actor played Tom Campbell in the 1966 Doctor Who movie Daleks’ Invasion Earth: 2150 A.D., which starred the legendary Peter Cushing as The Doctor. 

Written by Russell T. Davies and directed by Euros Lyn, Doctor Who: The End of Time also guest-stars Catherine Tate (as Donna Noble), Timothy Dalton (as The Narrator), David Harewood (as Joshua Naismith) and June Whitfield (as Minnie Hooper). Part One airs Saturday, December 26th @ 9:00 p.m. EST/PST on BBC America, with Part Two airing the following week, Saturday, January 2nd, 2010 @ 8:00 p.m. EST/PST. 

MASTER FILE – The only other survivor along with the Doctor of a long-dead alien race called the Time Lords, The Master, first played by Roger Delgardo, made his debut in the 1971  Jon Pertwee (Third Doctor) adventure The Terror of the Autons. For three seasons, the two Time Lords matched wits, until the Master’s final appearance in the season 10 Doctor Who episode Frontier in Space. Delgardo was scheduled to guest-star in one more story, but, sadly, was killed in a car crash on June 18th, 1973 while working in Turkey on another project. 

The Master was not seen again until the 1976 episode The Deadly Assassin. Portrayed under heavy make-up by actor Peter Pratt and in his thirteenth and final regeneration, the now grossly disfigured Time Lord was defeated by the Fourth Doctor (Tom Baker). In one last bid to save himself, The Master (still a husk of his former self and now played by Geoffrey Beevers) returned five years later in Baker’s penultimate story, The Keeper of Traken. Taking over the mind and body of Tremas, a scientist from the world of Traken, The Master was reborn in the guise of actor Anthony Ainley. Following the death and regeneration of Baker’s Doctor in Logopolis, The Master carried on with his quest for power and domination of the Universe, his schemes continually thwarted by Doctors Five (Peter Davison), Six (Colin Baker) and Seven (Sylvester McCoy). Ainley’s incarnation of the character made his final appearance in the Seventh Doctor’s swan song weekly TV adventure, Survival

Feature film actor Eric Roberts reprised the role of The Master in the 1996 made-for-TV Doctor Who movie, which starred Paul McGann as the Eighth Doctor. It was in the Tenth Doctor episode Utopia, that our hero crossed paths yet again with his old enemy, played by Sir Derek Jacobi. This incarnation of The Master, however, was unaware of his true identity, and only when prompted by a piece of technology did he recall his past lives as a Time Lord. When mortally wounded, The Master regenerated into a much younger version of his former self (actor John Simm). In what later appeared to be one final battle between him and  The Doctor, The Master refused to regenerate and died… or did he? John Simm is back as The Master to cause more chaos and destruction in Doctor Who: The End of Time

The Doctor meets up again with a representative of the Ood. Photo copyright of the BBC

Wilf and The Doctor are on the move! Photo copyright of the BBC

Into the TARDIS! Photo copyright of the BBC

Guest-star David Harewood (center) as Joshua Naismith. Photo copyright of the BBC

Former companion Donna Noble (Catherine Tate) returns. Photo copyright of the BBC

The Doctor can't quite believe his eyes! Photo copyright of the BBC

Hello world! Yes, it's me, The Master. Photo copyright of the BBC

As noted above, all photos from Doctor Who: The End of Time, Part One are copyright of the BBC, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any kind. Thanks!