Posts Tagged ‘David Eick’

The Syfy Channel’s 2010 Upfront Event In Photos

March 20, 2010

ON March 16th, 2010, some of the Syfy Channel’s brightest stars joined network executives and invited guests for Syfy’s Upfront Event at New York’s Museum of Modern Art to help the channel celebrate its ratings success as well as promote several upcoming projects for the 2010-2011 broadcast season. Below are some photo highlights from the gathering. Enjoy! 

Warehouse 13's Eddie McClintock and Joanne Kelly. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

  

Sanctuary's Amanda Tapping. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Eureka's Salli Richardson-Whitfield and Colin Ferguson. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Destination Truth's Josh Gates and Eureka's Colin Ferguson. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Stargate Universe's David Blue and Ming-Na. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Ghost Hunters' Amy Bruni and Kris Williams with Destination Truth's Josh Gates. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Caprica co-creators/executive producers David Eick and Ronald D. Moore. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Caprica's Magda Apanowicz, Sashi Roiz, Alessandra Torresani and Esai Morales. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Stargate Universe's Ming-Na and Sanctuary's Amanda Tapping. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Haven's Emily Rose and Stargate Universe's David Blue. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Caprica's Esai Morales and Sasha Roiz. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Destination Truth's Josh Gates, Sanctuary's Amanda Tapping and David Howe, President, Syfy. Photo by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel

As noted above, all photos by Jason DeCrow and copyright of the Syfy Channel, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any kind. Thanks!

Caprica’s David Eick and Paula Malcomson – Vive La Difference!

February 23, 2010

Caprica co-creator/executive producer David Eick. Photo by Chris Haston and copyright of the Syfy Channel

Paula Malcomson as Caprica's Amanda Graystone. Photo by Joe Pugliese and copyright of the Syfy Channel

On January 22nd, 2010, the long-awaited Battlestar Galactica prequel Caprica premiered on The Syfy Channel. A few days before, series co-creator/executive producer David Eick and cast member Paula Malcomson, who portrays Amanda Graystone, spent some time on the phone speaking with myself as well as several other journalists about the series. The following is an edited version of our conversation. Enjoy!  

Can you talk about the intention to make Caprica different from Battlestar Galactica, because it definitely has a whole different feel to it.  

DAVID EICK – I think we’re very intently committed to the idea that this show stand on its own, and that it not in any way feel like an echo, a descendent or an extension of Battlestar Galactica. You’ll note that the title is not Battlestar Galactica Caprica, but simply Caprica. The relationship that it has to Battlestar is purely inconsequential. It’s kind of in an Easter egg sense of fun for the fans and audience that followed Battlestar Galactica. However, if you never saw a lick of that show, it will have no impact on your ability to really get involved in and relate to the characters as well as the drama that we’re doing on Caprica.  

People can pretty much watch Caprica in a lot of different places other than on the Syfy Channel, such as on-line. Is that part of your design or does that come from the network?  

DE – Well, it was a network design, but I believe – and I’m not certain about this – that it’s a release strategy or a distribution strategy that other networks have tried as well. I think Glee may have done something like this where the pilot premiered and after a period of time went by, the pilot re-premiered as a launch to the TV series. So I think in a multi-platform universe as it were, where people are consuming dramatic material on their televisions, DVD players and the Internet, it’s really kind of smart and ahead of the game to figure out new and unorthodox ways to launch a TV show. But, yes, that was definitely the network’s call and we were happy to get onboard. In fact, it gave us an excuse to spend even more money on the pilot, and the version that ultimately aired was sort of tricked out with a bunch of new shots and visual effects as well as a couple of scenes we even re-shot. So it’s been worth it all around.  

Paula, it seems from watching the first few episodes that your character has a lot of really tough moments to play, and she makes a lot of choices that might make her unsympathetic in the eyes of a lot of viewers. I’m wondering how you struggled with portraying that and making her a likeable character?  

PAULA MALCOLMSON – It’s definitely something that occurs to you in the back of your mind, but as an actor you have to sort of put aside your own judgements in terms of whether your character is necessarily good or bad. I think being a good actor is sort of understanding the complexity of the human psyche and also knowing that none of us are perfect. So it was tough and I did think about it, particularly that many people would perhaps find Amanda unsympathetic. I just really tried to tap into the character’s loss and pain as well as the fact that she has made mistakes and then go from there, you know?  

DE – I would also add that I don’t think in the sort of canon of this show or shows like it, that there’s a tremendous amount of concern for what I would call old-fashioned television tropes-like sympathetic characters. I think audiences want challenging characters and ones who are neither black or white but somewhere in the middle and who are going to challenge the audience’s expectation in every way. One of the reasons that Paula plays her character so well is that you’re never quite sure what to expect from her. And there are times when you expect her to maybe lose it, but, in fact, she completely holds it together and vice versa. I think that’s human and real and part of what I think is the hallmark of the show.  

David, how much impact did female viewership play in not setting the series in space or relying heavily on space scenes?  

DE – Most of the people I spoke to about Battlestar in terms of the fan base were women, so the empirical demographic breakdown of the audience is something that I just chose to keep at bay and not pay a lot of attention to. So I never really think in terms of gearing a show towards a particular audience. In more general terms, yes, I do recognize the fact that perhaps a female audience might be more inclined to watch a story that’s more of a soap operatic kind of melodrama and without the accompanying visual sort of ghetto and spaceships and outer space. Something like that might have more accessibility to a female audience just because of that generalization. But that was never a motivation for not setting Caprica in space. The motivation was to make it as different and unique from Battlestar as possible.  

David, when you guys did Battlestar Galactica, you and Ron Moore (Caprica co-creator and executive producer) talked about how the plot of the show evolved organically instead of having everything mapped out in a specific direction. Based on your experience, have you changed that creative process, and if not, why have you stuck with that mentality?  

DE -Ron Moore and I had a number of discussions about this very early on. We come from very different backgrounds in terms of how writers’ rooms are run. On Star Trek – and I heard all this third hand and cannot confirm any of it – but presumably the outline process takes place in the room. It’s very precise, very detailed. There’s not a lot of jazz or improvisation invited or tolerated, and it’s almost a military-like environment. That’s not to say that the work was any less good, it’s just that it was run with that level of discipline and structured parameters. I’ve worked with other writers and producers in a variety of different capacities and there was a much looser environment where young writers were encouraged to come up with ideas and contribute. You might throw some suggestions out, and you might find others brilliant. The downside of that is you would sometimes have an episode that didn’t work.  

So I think we wanted to sort of combine the best of both these [writing] environments. When it came to how the writers’ room was run on Battlestar, and then later on Caprica, it’s about having a structure or large picture plan usually concocted by me and Ron during the hiatus. That would then be delivered to the writing staff and everyone was encouraged to improvise and add and subtract and change and go crazy and just sort of create an environment where there are no bad ideas. If then we lost our way, we’d circle back to where we really wanted to go. So it really is a combination of running a tight ship and yet allowing for there to be a great deal of improvisation and changes on the fly, purely with the intent of developing the best ideas.  

PM – That applies on-set with the actors as well in terms of loosely dealing with the script, so when a surprise or something interesting comes up, we have the luxury to be able to follow that instinct. It’s really the only way to work as far as I’m concerned, otherwise there are no surprises and it’s boring, you know? Just the other day one of the directors said to me, “I never know what you’re going to do,” and I said, “Neither do I.” There’s just something amazing and beautiful about that, and hopefully it works.  

Paula, could you tell is a little bit about how you first became involved in Caprica and about your audition process for the role?  

PM – I met with Jeffrey Reiner, who directed the pilot, and I hit it off with him. He’s very smart and a huge film buff, so he just seemed like the kind of director I wanted to work with. So it was first of all responding to the material, and then meeting Jeffrey. I initially auditioned for the role of Sister Clarice, but Jeffrey wanted to see me play Amanda. I was hesitant about that, though, because I didn’t know if I could play that character. I was frightened of that, and I realized that that was a really good thing. Then I met David and Ron and everyone else involved. I think was the first person they cast, followed by Esai Morales [Joseph Adama], Eric Stolz [Daniel Graystone] and then Polly Walker [Sister Clarice], so I was delighted with the people who I’d be working with.  

David, with the first season of the show almost wrapped, what maybe have you enjoyed most so far about bringing the Caprica story to life?  

DE – Well, the biggest and most pleasant surprise was the one that we sort of didn’t allow ourselves to dream could happen, which was to get as lucky as we did with this [acting] ensemble. That phrase about you’re only as strong as your weakest link really applies when you’re dealing with an ensemble cast. And so we were very fortunate to have such strength across the boards from such established and well-recognized actors like Paula, Polly Walker, Esai and Eric, combined with people like Sasha Roiz [Sam Adama], who were going to be brand new to an American audience and are able to hold their own. Those are things you can’t plan for, you just have to hope. We got together in Lake Tahoe way back in January of last year to start breaking stories, so it wasn’t for lack of planning when it came to aiming to make the show good in every way that we could control. But as hard as you might work on casting and such, you just never know until you get there, and we just got incredibly lucky with our cast and crew as well.  

As noted above, photos by Chris Haston and Joe Pugliese and copyright of The Syfy Channel, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any kind. Thanks!

Patton Oswalt Cast in Syfy’s Caprica

August 17, 2009

THE Syfy Channel has announced that celebrated comedian Patton Oswalt will guest-star on its highly-anticipated series Caprica, premiering January 22nd, 2010. Oswalt will play the role of Baxter Samo, the wildly popular Caprican comedian talk show host on whose show Daniel and Amanda Graystone (Eric Stoltz and Paula Malcomson, respectively) ultimately appear.

Humanity’s storyline takes completely new twists with Caprica, which follows two rival families and their patriarchs – Daniel Graystone (Eric Stoltz) and Joseph Adama (Esai Morales) – as they compete and thrive in the vibrant realm of the 12 Colonies, a society recognizably close to our own. This original, standalone series will feature the passion, intrigue, political backbiting, and family conflict in an omnipotent society that is at the height of its blind power and glory…and, unknowingly, on the brink of its fall. Caprica also stars Paula Malcomson (Amanda Graystone), Polly Walker (Sister Clarice Willow), Magda Apanowicz (Lacy) and Alessandra Torresani (Zoe Graystone). The series is from Universal Cable Productions and executive produced by Ronald D. Moore, David Eick and Jane Espenson. Jeffrey Reiner (Friday Night Lights) directed the pilot.

As a comedian, Oswalt has released three TV specials and two critically acclaimed albums. This month, his one-hour Comedy Central Special, My Weakness is Strong, will premiere on air as well as on DVD/CD through Warner Bros. records. Patton tours regularly and extensively, headlining both in the United States and the UK. A regular at music festivals like Bumbershoot, Bonaroo and Coachella, he has also made the jump to theaters, as well as performing/reading at events by McSweeney’s and The Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. He has a regular bi-monthly show at the new Largo at the Coronet Theater in Los Angeles, and was also a regular fill-in host for Steve Jones on the nationally syndicated Jonesey’s Jukebox on Indie 103.1.

A versatile performer, Oswalt has also appeared in more than 20 films including Magnolia, Starsky and Hutch and Reno 911!: Miami, and provided the voice for Remy the Rat in Pixar’s Oscar-winning Ratatouille. Later this month, Patton will make his dramatic debut on the big screen as Paul Aufiero in Big Fan, the directorial debut of writer Robert Siegel (The Wrestler). Oswalt will also appear in Steven Soderbergh’s feature film The Informant, and recently appeared in Observe and Report with Seth Rogan.

His many television roles include Spence on The King of Queens on CBS for nine seasons as well as appearing on Seinfeld, Reaper, Aqua Teen Hunger Force and Tim and Eric’s Awesome Show, Great Job! Oswalt is also recurring again on the second season of Showtime’s The United States of Tara. He is a regular contributor to Countdown with Keith Olbermann, Real Time with Bill Maher and Lewis Black’s Root of All Evil.

Battlestar Galactica Named Program Of The Year By The TCA

August 3, 2009

THIS past weekend, the Television Critics Association (TCA) recognized The Syfy Channel’s epic series Battlestar Galactica with the award for the Program of the Year in a ceremony held August 1st at the Langham Hotel and Spa in Pasadena, California. Battlestar Galactica took the top prize after ending its four season run this past March as one of television’s most raved-about shows.

The 25th annual TCA Awards honored the finest work of the 2008-09 season as selected by the association’s 200+ member critics and journalists.

Battlestar Galactica is the gripping saga of humanity’s last remnants and their struggle to find a new home while fleeing from their deadly Cylon enemies. Redefining the space opera with its gritty realism, Galactica‘s intensity, issues-driven topicality, and command performances have garnered it numerous awards, including two Emmys and the prestigious George Foster Peabody Award. The show was recognized by the American Film Institute (AFI), and for two years running was one of the most outstanding programs of the year. The series is from Universal Cable Productions and executive produced by Ronald D. Moore and David Eick.

Caprica Premieres In 2010 On The Syfy Channel

July 27, 2009

SYFY has announced the air date for its highly-anticipated upcoming series Caprica. On Friday, January 22nd @ 9 p.m., the show will kick off with a two-hour premiere and will air regularly on subsequent Fridays @ 10 p.m.

Humanity’s storyline takes completely new twists with Caprica, which follows two rival families and their patriarchs -Daniel Graystone (Eric Stoltz) and Joseph Adama (Esai Morales) – as they compete and thrive in the vibrant realm of the Twelve Colonies, a society recognizably close to our own. This original, standalone series will feature the passion, intrigue, political backbiting, and family conflict in an omnipotent society that is at the height of its blind power and glory…and, unknowingly, on the brink of its fall.

Caprica's Eric Stoltz (Daniel Graystone) and Alessandra Torresani (Zoe Graystone). Photo by Evans Ward and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Caprica's Eric Stoltz (Daniel Graystone) and Alessandra Torresani (Zoe Graystone). Photo by Evans Ward and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Esai Morales (Joseph Adama) with Caprica writer/executive producer Jane Espenson. Photo by Evans Ward and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Esai Morales (Joseph Adama) with Caprica writer/executive producer Jane Espenson. Photo by Evans Ward and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Caprica also stars Paula Malcomson (Amanda Graystone), Polly Walker (Sister Clarice Willow), Magda Apanowicz (Lacy) and Alessandra Torresani (Zoe Graystone). The series is from Universal Cable Productions and executive produced by Ronald D. Moore, David Eick and Jane Espenson. Jeffrey Reiner (Friday Night Lights) directed the pilot.

As noted above, photos by Evans Ward and copyright of The Syfy Channel, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any form. Thanks!