Archive for August, 2009

Eureka’s Joe Morton Guest-Stars On This Week’s Warehouse 13

August 31, 2009
Joe Morton, who plays Henry Deacon on Eureka, wanders over to Warehouse 13 this week to check things out. Photo copyright of The Syfy Channel

Joe Morton, who plays Henry Deacon on Eureka, wanders over to Warehouse 13 this week to check things out. Photo copyright of The Syfy Channel

FOLLOWING an appearance on Warehouse 13 by some of his fellow Eureka castmates, Joe Morton (Henry Deacon) guest-stars on this week’s episode, Regrets. In it, Artie (Saul Rubinek) receives word of a rash of unexplained suicides at a Florida prison, so he sends Pete (Eddie McClintock) and Myka (Joanne Kelly) to investigate. Claudia (Allison Scagliotti), relegated to inventory duty, decides to change a light bulb – with the help of an artifact… Regrets airs Tuesday, September 1st @ 9 p.m. EST/8 p.m. CT on The Syfy Channel.

Click on the link below to download a clip from the episode: https://rcpt.yousendit.com/732273387/290b7b6809a3499f549388177878f694

As noted above, photo is copyright of The Syfy Channel, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any kind. Thanks!

Defying Gravity’s Eyal Podell – Physician Heal Thy Self

August 30, 2009
Defying Gravity's Dr. Evram Mintz (Eyal Podell). Photo by Kharen Hill and copyright of Fox Studios and ABC.

Defying Gravity's Dr. Evram Mintz (Eyal Podell). Photo by Kharen Hill and copyright of Fox Studios and ABC.

On the surface, Dr. Evram Mintz appears ready to take his first step into the unknown. As a member of the International Space Organization (ISO), he participated in a five-year program in preparation for six-year mission onboard the spaceship Antares to explore the other planets in our solar system. However, like his fellow shipmates, Evram brings with him some emotional and psychological baggage that could compromise his ability to care for the physical and mental well-being of those around him. Facing his inner demons is not easy for Evram, but for the actor who plays him on Defying Gravity, Eyal Podell, it is part of discovering just who his character is.

“Evram is the Antares crew physician, psychiatrist, resident drunk and in many ways voice of reality,” says Podell, who is dressed in his character’s flight suit and waiting in his trailer to be called to set. “The greatest [acting] challenge with him came, I think, when my conception of the character changed. Once all the roles were cast and everyone came together, we realized that between Zahf [Paroo], who plays Ajay Sharma, Florentine [Lahme], who plays Nadia, and Peter Howitt [who plays Trevor Williams], we already had three or four different accents on the show.

“So [executive producers] Jim Parriott and Michael Edelstein said, ‘Let’s strip the accent away from your character.’ That immediately sent me right back to ground zero because I felt in many ways that one of Evram’s defining characteristics was his foreign personality [Israeli] and point of view. So having to kind of start from the ground up again was a bit of a challenge, and then in the first few scripts there wasn’t much character revelation or backstory with Evram. However, as episodes four, five, six, seven and eight came along, more and more of Evram’s history began coming through,” enthuses the actor, “so that allowed me to piece him together.

“In general, astronauts have to be terribly brave, visionary and optimistic people, and part of my challenge was figuring out what the hell was Evram doing here. That meant talking with Jim and Michael about exactly why he wanted to be part of this mission, other than the grandeur of being one of the first humans to travel to these other planets. There must have been something else behind it, and answering that question helped me form a clearer picture of my character. Evram has a dim view of humanity and he’s experienced the trauma of war. He has been involved in some of the big Middle Eastern conflicts that have taken place in the future, and those experiences obviously shaped his outlook on life as well as humankind.

Evram ponders what situation might unfold next onboard the Antares. Photo by Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios and ABC

Evram ponders what situation might unfold next onboard the Antares. Photo by Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios and ABC

“Maybe it was a subconscious choice of Evram’s to get on a spaceship and get as far away as possible from his own flaws, including his issues with alcohol and war. If he’s billions of miles away, he doesn’t have to be drafted, or read on the Internet or watch on the news the non-stop footage of bombings, killings and murders – the atrocities that man commits against man.”

Was it destiny that led Podell to his role on Defying Gravity? Ironically, when he was in 10th grade, the actor wrote a term paper about being a doctor. “Then, though, I realized I didn’t have the stomach to go to medical school and spend however long it would take with internships, residencies and all that other stuff,” he recalls.

“However, my parents raised me with the idea that an education is your ticket in life. One of the really important things they did for me was make sure I went to a good college [Dartmouth in Hanover, New Hampshire] so that I would have the proper foundation and tools to pursue whatever [career] I wanted. So I actually came into this business thinking, ‘OK, I’ll try this for a little while and see what happens,’ but I soon found that it was almost like a drug. You get a little bit of the joy early on and become hooked. From there, I chipped away at it [acting] and built a resume role-by-role. Just a few years ago I booked my first regular job on a soap opera [The Young and the Restless] and landing Defying Gravity is my first big break.”

The pilot episode of Defying Gravity establishes that the story is told in present day (2052) and in space with the Antares crew – four men and four women – as well as in flashbacks where the astronauts first meet and start their mission training. Audiences also see that despite Evram Mintz’s rather dark and grim view of the human race, he has not scared away someone who truly cares about him.

Dr. Evram Mintz during training for the Antares mission. Photo by Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios and ABC

Dr. Evram Mintz during training for the Antares mission. Photo by Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios and ABC

“In the first episode we’re introduced to my character’s love interest, Dr. Claire Dereux, played by Maxine Roy, and it would appear that she and Evram have been in a relationship for a number of years,” notes Podell. “And it’s been interesting to find out through the flashback element of the show how they came to be in that relationship. It’s also a little strange because in the flashbacks we’re all just meeting as a crew, so we don’t quite know each other that well yet. However, in the present day, we’ve already been through five years of training, so what does that mean in terms of our relationships? Which of our strengths as well as weaknesses did we reveal to each other during training? What personal struggles have we seen one another experience? Have we been there for each other as shoulders to cry on? Have we picked one another up off the ground and said, ‘Come on, get back on the horse.’ Have we had fist-fights? Who knows?

“So there’s a while lot of history to be filled in. However, what we do sort of assume is that we’ve reached a point where we can look around at each other and say, ‘I trust you with my life.’ There’s a camaraderie among the crew. They’re a family, and they have to be because they’re going to be together for a very long time. That being said, even with your brothers and sisters, you feel like ‘killing them’ sometimes, which I think is a compelling aspect of our show, especially in that these people are essentially locked under one roof.”

Acting-wise, has it been difficult for Podell jockeying between flashbacks and present day? “It’s not so much the bouncing back and forth as to who we [the characters] are, but more how we relate to one another,” he says. “With relationships in general, you come into them being neutral. So as our characters come into the [training] program, they look at one another and think, ‘Oh, there’s a guy, and there’s a girl.’ The exceptions to that are those who have reputations, like Maddux Donner [Ron Livingston], Ted Shaw [Malik Yoba] and some of the other astronauts who have done some incredible things. However, the rest of these people look at each other and they don’t know one another from a hole in the wall, so they don’t have any preconceived notions.

“As the series begins to unfold, we see our characters in the flashbacks start to uncover pieces about each other. They then gather all this ‘evidence’ up and we sort of see how that affects their perception of one another. So the flashback elements are fascinating in that our characters are still trying to pull things out of each other and fill in the gaps. It’s a strange dynamic, and in some ways I feel like those scenes are much more fun to play when it comes to character development.”

Evram on-duty in the Antares' sickbay. Photo by Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios and ABC

Evram on-duty in the Antares' sickbay. Photo by Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios and ABC

As far as a favorite Defying Gravity episode, one immediately comes to the actor’s mind. “Part of our characters’ training involves having to back each other up job-wise if necessary,” explains Podell. “So as a physician, Evram has to teach the other astronaut candidates something about medicine. So that was a fun episode where I really got to play doctor and ‘perform’ surgeries and things of that nature. As an actor, I’d never had to do scenes like that before involving medical jargon, special effects, blood and guts and cool equipment like you see on TV. Evram also gets to share some of his backstory with the other characters, which I was pleased about.

“Funnily enough, my wife went in for surgery not too long ago to have her appendix removed. I wanted to make her feel at ease, so I was trying to make light of the moment and asked the surgeons, ‘Do you want me to scrub up? I’ve had some experience.’ I started throwing words around that I’d used in the show and the doctors were looking at me as if to say, ‘Hey, you know your stuff.’ I had a photo taken on my cell phone of me on-set, which I showed to the surgeon and said, ‘See, I’ve been there.’ Meanwhile, my wife is rolling her eyes and saying, ‘He just plays a doctor on TV. Don’t let him near me,'” chuckles the actor.

While Sci-Fi drama is nothing new to TV, Podell is hoping that audiences look deeper into Defying Gravity and discover what makes it different. “Michael Edelstein and Jim Parriott refer to this as Science Fact, and I think that’s very interesting given that we’re right on the cusp of these [real world] advancements with the European Space Agency as well as China and a whole new space race that’s being launched,” muses the actor. “All these things are relevant because our show looks at what’s going to happen with the space program 30 or 40 years from now. Although the series is set in the future, it’s not so far ahead that you can’t comprehend it. I think audiences will be curious to see what our technology might be capable of and where humanity might be headed as far as working together to explore the universe.

“There is also the fact that the stakes with space travel are quite high from a very real perspective because our characters don’t have transporters or any of the typical Sci-Fi devices. For example, they’re still vulnerable to the affects of exposure to space on the human body. I think it’s in the pilot where Donner says something like, ‘When exposed to the vacuum of space, humans are like pinatas. We just explode, burst, freeze, die, etc.’ So it’s a fine line between life and death, which is always intriguing. And then there is the mystery element to our story, in that what are we going to find when we get out there in the universe.

Evram Mintz standing in one of the Antares corridors. Photo by Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios and ABC

Evram Mintz standing in one of the Antares corridors. Photo by Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios and ABC

“Jim and Michael have some really cool stuff planned when it comes to planting things along the way and piquing the audience’s interest to make people wonder what’s going to happen next.”

In addition to Defying Gravity, the actor’s other TV credits include CSI: NY, ER, The West Wing, House and Without A Trace as well as recurring roles on 24 and The Game. On the big screen, Podell made his debut playing Al Pacino’s son in The Insider, and has since appeared in such movies as Unconditional Love, Blowing Smoke and the independent feature Hard Scrambled. His fans perhaps best know him for his two-year stint on the aforementioned The Young and the Restless, as well as his multiple episode arc as Ryan Burnett in season seven of 24.

24 was a lot of fun,” says Podell. “It was great to be back on-set with Kurtwood Smith, who played my boss [Senator Blaine Mayer] in the show. He also played my boss in a little independent film we both worked on. Kurtwood tortured me in that, and here I was getting tortured by Kiefer Sutherland [Jack Bauer] in 24,” jokes the actor. “It was awesome getting to watch Kiefer at work. I’m always looking to learn from people who have been in this business longer than I have and have endured. Kiefer gave 150% of himself. he was the hardest working guy on-set and totally dedicated and committed to making the best product possible. Not one ounce of him was phoning it in, and I thought that was amazing.

“The response I received from people about my being in the show was terrific. The second they saw me on it, they started saying, ‘You’re going to die, right? He’s going to kill you. That’s what happens. If you’re with Jack Bauer, you’re dead.’ So that was tough having to keep my mouth shut about it for a few months. Of course, my character got tortured and then had his throat slit. I don’t know why, but I tend to get killed a lot on TV. Hopefully that won’t happen here,” he says laughing.

No matter where his career takes him, Podell will never forget something Gene Hackman said to him and a group of other actors during a break on the set of Behind Enemy Lines. “One day we were all sitting around – these young actors playing sailors and naval airmen – and nervously pretending to do something else other than stare at Gene Hackman while he was sitting there reading a book,” says the actor.

Evram monitors a situation while on-duty on the Antares flight deck. Photo by Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios and ABC

Evram monitors a situation while on-duty on the Antares flight deck. Photo by Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios and ABC

“Gene could sense that we were all hoping that he would say something, so he looked up and asked, ‘Do you guys still audition?’ It was a totally redundant question,which he knew, and we were all like, ‘Sure.’ And he said, ‘Man, I used to love to audition.’ At first I thought, ‘Why?’ and then it dawned on me that he got to be the success he is because there was nothing else he’d rather do than walk into a roomful of strangers and put on a ‘show’ for two minutes. It wasn’t about being in Yugoslavia and filming a multi-million dollar feature for Fox Studios. It was about the bare minimum of that moment in the audition room, and that for two minutes a day, a week, twice a week, whatever, you get to entertain people. Learning little lessons like that early on in my career is what continues to serve me well in this business.”

Steve Eramo

Defying Gravity is produced by Fox Television Studios and OmniFilmProductions, in association with the BBC, Canada’s CTV and Germany’s ProSieben. As noted above, photos by Kharen Hill or Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios and ABC, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any kind. Thanks!

This Week On Being Human – 08 – 29 – 09

August 29, 2009
Our roomies, Mitchell (Aidan Turner), George (Russell Tovey) and Annie (Lenora Crichlow), face an uncertain future together in the season one finale of Being Human. Photo copyright of Touchpaper Television and the BBC

Our roommates, Mitchell (Aidan Turner), George (Russell Tovey) and Annie (Lenora Crichlow), face an uncertain future together in the season one finale of Being Human. Photo copyright of Touchpaper Television and the BBC

SPOILER ALERT!! – Vampire Mitchell is in the hospital following an almost-fatal attack on his doorstep. He does not want his friends involved in the inevitable showdown with his lethal attackers, but Annie bravely decides that she cannot just stand by without doing anything. But George is faced with a huge dilemma. Should he try to help Mitchell or should he flee and try to start a normal life with his girlfriend? He has to choose between his friends and his lover. He knows Mitchell will need all the help he can get, but the lure of a normal human life is so strong. Episode six of season one airs  on Saturday, August 29th @ 9 p.m. EST/PST on BBC America.

As noted above, photo is copyright of Touchpaper Television and the BBC, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any kind. Thanks!

Eureka’s Niall Matter – Matter of Fact

August 28, 2009
Niall Matter as Zane Donovan on Eureka. Photo by F. Scott Schafer and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Niall Matter as Zane Donovan on Eureka. Photo by F. Scott Schafer and copyright of The Syfy Channel

In the second season Eureka episode E=MC…? some of the world’s smartest minds try to re-create the “Big Bang” and the first moments that the universe came into being. As is typical in this Pacific Northwest hotbed of brilliance, things go somewhat awry. The town’s geniuses suddenly lose their smarts, and it is up to Sheriff Jack Carter and a young, cocky know-it-all, Zane Donovan, to save the day. It is no accident that Zane came to Eureka, and he has since ended up sticking around, which was a pleasant surprise for the actor who plays him, Niall Matter.

“When I first heard about the audition for the character I was told that it was a guest-star role and a possible recurring one,” recalls Matter. “So I went in to read and the director of the episode, Tim Matheson, seemed to like what I did. He gave me a little bit of direction as did the casting director, then I came in for a callback, ended up booking the role and before I knew it I was on-set working on Eureka.

“My first day on the job I was immediately impressed by Colin Ferguson [Sheriff Jack Carter] and the amount of energy that he has. It carries through the entire day, too, and it doesn’t matter if that day lasts eight hours or sixteen hours. Colin is ‘present’ the entire time and ready to go. With him, I saw what it takes to be the number one on a TV show.

“In this episode I was really able to get into comedy. I hadn’t done much of that before, so I was able to spread my wings. And when it comes to the cast, Joe Morton [Henry Deacon] as well as Ed Quinn [Dr. Nathan Stark] back then, along with Salli Richardson [Dr. Allison Blake], Erica Cerra [Deputy Jo Lupo], all of them, their comic timing is so different.

“So working with each of them, respectively, in whatever scene I had, it was pretty cool figuring my own timing out and where my character was going with each of the others in the story. It was like trying to piece together a puzzle and I wanted to make sure I did my best so that they [the producers] would ask me back,” jokes the actor. “I loved that my character actually got to save the day when he stopped the device from detonating. After all, you don’t get to do that every day.”

Eureka producers were obviously impressed enough with Matter’s debut that they made his character a recurring one. Having been arrested for allegedly crashing that New York Stock Exchange, Zane was originally meant to go to jail. However, rather than waste his intellectual talents, the authorities decided instead to send him to Eureka. After helping avert a disaster in E=MC…? he was offered a job at Global Dynamics. With his character now appearing in more episodes, Matter looked at giving Zane a bit of a makeover.

“I wanted to start opening him up and taking him in other directions,” he says. “As I became more confident about my work on the show, I began talking with Jaime Paglia [Eureka co-creator/executive producer] about the direction of my character as far as where he wanted to take Zane and where I was thinking he could go.

“As a result, I think we’ve shaped him into a pretty cool human being. Zane has shed a great deal of his stubbornness, because initially he was, not cold, but pretty snarky and kind of annoying. We had to tread carefully, though, with that fine line of change in order to make it believable. I mean, how quickly can someone turn that corner. So that’s been a little bit tricky for me, but the writers have been a huge help and we’ve managed to transform Zane into someone who’s much more likable. He’s grown up and matured as well as taken on some responsibility, which is nice.”

Among those Eureka residents who have changed their opinion of Zane since he first arrived in town is Deputy Lupo. Not an easy person to win over, she found herself attracted to Zane in more ways than one, and during the show’s past two seasons, they have become romantically involved.

“The relationship between Jo and Zane was somewhat ambiguous at the beginning and we weren’t really sure what was going on,” notes Matter. “Now, however, this third season it’s heading towards a very realistic and mature level, and it’s a great to see that they share a true connection and have a lot of love for one another.

“One of the neat things with their relationship is that Zane will rib her and Jo will give it right back to him. I’ve seen couples do that in real life and those are the moments that you remember and help also define a relationship, so it’s been fun to re-create those moments with Erica onscreen. There was one episode [From Fear to Eternity] where Jo and Zane were stuck together, and the moment they got unstuck, she said something to me and I said something right back at her. I can’t remember exactly what I said because it wasn’t scripted, I ad-libbed it, but it actually made the final cut [of the episode] and the crew just killed themselves laughing. Jo and Zane did plenty of kibitzing in that episode when they were stuck together and that helped create a stronger bond between them.”

In the third season Eureka story Your Face or Mine, which was directed by Colin Ferguson, Zane almost loses Jo when a scientist (Leela Savasta) uses technology that she has created to steal the deputy’s identity and…life. “That was a challenging one because I had to work with another actress who’s supposedly Jo inside this other person’s body,” says Matter. “Being directed by Colin was incredible because he’s got such a clear vision for the show. He knows exactly what he wants and where he thinks the series should be going. The actual shooting of the episode was both concise and quick, so when it comes to Colin I just think he’s a genius.”

Following Ferguson’s directorial debut on Eureka, Matter and the rest of the show’s cast and crew also had the chance to be directed this season by Joe Morton with the episode Have an Ice Day. “Obviously this story has something to do with ice, and at one point Zane becomes very cold, one could say almost freezing over,” teases the actor.

“Working with Joe Morton in the director’s chair was incredible. I grew up watching him on TV and in the movies, and I’ll never forget coming onto this show and meeting Joe for the first time and being quite intimidated by the fact that I was actually getting to hold my own in a scene opposite him. So when being directed by Joe, everything he said to me, any notes or redirection he gave me, I soaked it in. I wanted to make sure I gave him everything he wanted because I respect him so much as an actor and I really wanted to garner some respect in his eyes as a director.”

Born and raised in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, Matter was 13 years old when he started writing and directing his own films, and then began acting in them as well. “I’d get in front of the camera with the other actors I was working with to show them the shots I wanted,” he explains. “Then I would go into the editing room and edit all my films on my own. They were only shorts, maybe five or ten minutes long and usually in the horror genre, but that’s how I first got into this.”

Having only been in the business for a few years, the actor has already appeared in a variety of made-for-TV movies as well as recurring roles or guest-spots on such series as The Best Years, Fear Itself, Warehouse 13, Melrose Place and Stargate Atlantis.

“On Stargate Atlantis I played someone called Lt. Kemp and I worked opposite Kavan Smith, who played Major Lorne,” says Matter. “My character was a short-lived one – he was only in two episodes – but working on those sets was incredible. I had no idea how elaborate they were, and I remember just being blown away when I first saw them. I was like a kid in a candy store walking around and checking everything out.”

One of Matter’s most high-profile roles to date has to be Mothman in the big screen superhero flick Watchmen. “That was a dream come true,” he says. “It was a massive blockbuster film directed by Zack Synder, who also did 300, and I couldn’t believe I had the chance to work with him. It was kind of a surreal moment the first time I stood there on-set talking with Zack. Shooting that movie was one of the most enjoyable experiences I’ve ever had because he makes the work fun, and I’ve never seen anyone more prepared than Zack. I think when he sleeps, he plans out his shots,” jokes Matter. “I had an amazing time.”

With every job he goes out for, the actor makes sure the character is as different as possible from the last one he played, and with each new role, Matter gets to entertain more and more people, which for him is what acting is all about. “The fact that you can reach so many people in this industry and bring joy into their homes, whether through TV or films, and relating to them life experiences in a truthful way is what I find most rewarding about this job,” muses the actor. “And also leaving [work] at the end of the day knowing that you emotionally connected to your scenes and, hopefully, that will transcend over into someone else’s life. I think acting is a pretty powerful tool that can actually be used to help change the world for the better, and I’m happy to play some small part in that.”

For more information about Niall check out his official website – www.niallmatter.net

As noted above, photo by F. Scott Schafer and copyright of The Sci Fi Channel, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any kind. Thanks!

Summer Glau Moves Into Joss Whedon’s Dollhouse

August 27, 2009

SUMMER Glau (Firely, Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles) reunites with Joss Whedon when the actress joins the cast of Dollhouse this fall in a recurring role as Bennett, a Dollhouse employee who shares a past with Echo (Eliza Dushku). The second season of Dollhouse premieres Friday, September 25th @ 9 p.m. EST/PST on Fox.

Additional guest-stars appearing throughout the upcoming second season include Alexis Denisof (Angel), Jamie Bamber (Battlestar Galactica), Michael Hogan (Battlestar Galactica) and Keith Carradine (Dexter). Daniel Perrin (Denisof) is a U.S. senator leading a witch hunt to track down the underground organization. Mysterious, charismatic businessman Martin Klar (Bamber) is Echo’s new husband. Bradley Karrens (Hogan) comes to the Dollhouse hoping to stop a psychotic family member’s killing spree, while Matthew Harding (Carradine), a nemesis of Dollhouse leader Adelle Dewitt (Olivia Williams), stirs up trouble. Additionally, Dr. Claire Saunders/Whiskey (Amy Acker) and Madeline/November (Miracle Laurie) return this season in multiple-episode arcs.

Dollhouse is produced by 20th Century Fox Television. The series was created by Joss Whedon, who also serves as executive producer, writer and director. Tim Minear and David Solomon are executive producers, while Tara Butters and Michele Fazekas are co-executive producers. Additionally, series star Eliza Dushku serves as a producer.

Sneak Peek At This Week’s Eureka – 08 – 28 – 09

August 27, 2009

SPOILER ALERT!! – In You Don’t Know Jack, Global Dynamics undergoes a Sonic Cleaning while Tess (Jaime Ray Newman) records a data bank of Eurekans’ memories when, oddly, the town experiences a communal form of memory loss. When the growing dilemma traps them inside GD during the cleaning, Allison (Salli Richardson-Whitfield) goes into labor and Carter (Colin Ferguson) must help her remember who she is in order to escape. You Don’t Know Jack airs Friday night, August 28th @ 9 p.m. EST/8 p.m. CT on The Syfy Channel.

Allison (Salli Richardson-Whitfield) finally has her baby with her "coach" Sheriff Jack Carter (Colin Ferguson) by her side. Photo by Marcel Williams and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Allison (Salli Richardson-Whitfield) finally has her baby with her "coach" Sheriff Jack Carter (Colin Ferguson) by her side. Photo by Marcel Williams and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Click the link below to get a sneak peak at You Don’t Know Jack http://www.yousendit.com/transfer.php?action=batch_download&batch_id=YkxJck82bEpRYTljR0E9PQ

As noted above, photo by Marcel Williams, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any form. Thanks!

Defying Gravity’s Florentine Lahme – In The Pilot’s Seat

August 26, 2009
Florentine Lahme as Nadia Schilling in Defying Gravity. Photo by Kharen Hill and copyright of Fox Studios/ABC

Florentine Lahme as Nadia Schilling in Defying Gravity. Photo by Kharen Hill and copyright of Fox Studios/ABC

Come on, be honest. There has been at least one birthday when you didn’t get exactly what you wanted. That was not the case, however, for German-born actress Florentine Lahme, who, on her last birthday, received what she calls a “very nice present” when auditioning for the role of Nadia Schilling on Defying Gravity.

“My first audition actually was on my birthday, and it was pretty exciting because it led to a callback for the role of Nadia,” says Lahme. “The second time around I did a video conference with the show’s producers, who were in Los Angeles and watching me in Germany. That was exciting, too, and a bit scary. I was doing a night shoot that evening for a film in Germany and my head was so full of lines and information that I couldn’t really concentrate on the audition. Fortunately, it was the same scene that I did for my first audition, so I did it once again. Then a month or two later I received a phone call asking me, ‘Would you like to come to Vancouver and join the series,’ and I told them, ‘Sure,” she says smiling.

“The funny thing is when I was a child, my Mom asked me, ‘What do you want to be when you grow up?’ and I said, ‘Maybe an astronaut.’ I don’t think I’d like to be one now in real life, but being one on TV is good.”

On Defying Gravity, Lahme portrays Nadia Schilling, an ace pilot who graduated at the top of her class at the International Space Organization (ISO). Highly intelligent and a striking beauty, she is not afraid to put her sex appeal or keen mathematical/scientific mind to good use, depending on what the situation requires. Nadia demands nothing less than perfection from herself and expects the same from her fellow astronauts onboard the Antares when they set off into outer space to explore Earth’s solar system. Jetting across the Atlantic, Lahme was anxious to step into Nadia’s shoes and begin work on the first of 13 season one episodes, but first she had to find her space legs as it were.

Nadia at the controls on the Antares flight deck. Photo by Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios/ABC

Nadia at the controls on the Antares flight deck. Photo by Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios/ABC

“I always have huge problems with jet-lag,” admits the actress. “So I was still pretty jet-lagged my first day of work. However, beyond that, the first thing I was impressed with were the sets, which are very expensive. On top of that, and more importantly, I felt like I was in good hands because of everyone working on the show.

“We had a great deal of green screen work to do in the first episode, so we constantly had to imagine what was going on out there in space. I also had to get used to wearing a wig, which I wear during the flashbacks. In the first episode, I had a love scene with Ron Livingston [Maddux Donner], too. Its always difficult when you don’t know each other and have to do a love scene. I get sweaty palms just thinking about it,” she jokes. “So I don’t love doing love scenes, but I do love David Straiton, who directed this episode. I really enjoyed working with him and he made it fun and really easy for me.”

Although she is not afraid to speak her mind, Nadia does not wear her emotions on her sleeve, so it took the actress a little time to figure her out. “Nadia is a funny character,” notes Lahme. “When I first read the script I thought, ‘Is she really human, or maybe she’s a robot? I don’t know.’ Nadia is very much focused on her job. She’s quite ambitious as well as earnest and always wants to be number one.

“You don’t get the feeling that Nadia is a terribly emotional person. She’s on her own most of the time and isn’t really interested in getting too close to her coworkers, except for Donner, of course, because he’s her lover. But the thing is, she treats him like a sex toy or tool. I like to describe her as a combination of the Terminator and Barbie, because you cannot look into her at all. She’s pretty icy. However, as the episodes go on, you actually get some insight into her emotionally and I get to reveal her vulnerable side, which I was very pleased about.”

Antares Commander Ted Shaw (Malik Yoba) and Nadia. Photo by Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios/ABC

Antares Commander Ted Shaw (Malik Yoba) and Nadia. Photo by Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios/ABC

Given that she is on a six-year mission with seven other astronauts, Nadia does make the effort to behave in a professional and cordial fashion towards her colleagues. Unfortunately, she has difficulty doing so when it comes to dealing with one particular member of the crew. “I enjoy working with Dylan [Taylor], who plays Steve Wassenfelder. His character and Nadia have a special relationship – she can’t stand him,” chuckles the actress. “My character likes to complain to him, ‘You eat too much and behave like a 12-year-old boy.’

“She doesn’t understand why Wassenfelder has been chosen for this mission, and I love the scenes with the two of them because they always butt heads. That makes for an acting challenge because in real life I like Dylan, but on TV I have to dislike him. Whenever a scene makes me feel uncomfortable I think it’s great because, again, it provides me with an acting challenge.”

While her character may feel uncomfortable relating to her crewmates, Lahme has no such problems with her Defying Gravity castmates. “The last show I did in Germany [GSG 9, an action series about an elite team of crime fighters] had a large cast, too,” she says. “So I’m used to working with a lot of actors, and I think it’s terrific that we have such a variety of nationalities – the Latina, the Israeli, the Indian, the German – and everyone is so nice. Sometimes you have the problem where someone is very arrogant, but that’s not true here. Everyone is very friendly. If, for example, there’s a word in the script that I don’t understand and it’s not in my [German/English] dictionary, they’ll help me figure it out. So it truly is a pleasure working with them.”

A native of Berlin, Lahme was 16 years old when she began modeling part-time to earn some extra money to help pay for her studies in economics and Japanese at the University of Berlin. That eventually led to her being invited to audition for TV shows. “It was really by accident that I got into this business,” recalls the actress. “My first TV job was a German soap opera set in a hospital, and I played a nurse. I was familiar with working in front of a camera because of my modeling, but it still felt a bit weird. Very soon, though, I began to feel like it was ‘my thing,’ and suddenly I knew I had to do this for a living.”

Nadia during training for the Antares mission. Photo by Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios/ABC

Nadia during training for the Antares mission. Photo by Sergei Bachlakov and copyright of Fox Studios/ABC

Along with Defying Gravity, the actress recently appeared with David James Elliott and James Cromwell in the Sci-Fi miniseries Impact. She has also worked on a variety of made-for-TV movies and German TV series, among the latter is the aforementioned GSG 9. “In that show I did pretty much what Nadia does in Defying Gravity as far as looking at a screen and giving advice,” explains Lahme.

“My character [Petra Helmholtz] was the brains on this particular show, and oh, God, the technobabble and all the monologues. I remember one day I had three pages of monologue and we didn’t have time to rehearse. So I just did it and it worked. I’m a very lucky girl in that I have a photographic memory, so if I have to do tech-talk, and even if I don’t understand it, it doesn’t matter. I can just picture the words in my mind and say them. That’s a great gift for an actor.”

Feature film-wise, Lahme starred in one of the most successful German movies ever, the romantic comedy Keinohrhasen (Rabbit With Ears). Other big screen credits include Fire, Maximum and the horror thriller Metamorphosis starring Christopher Lambert (Highlander). “I loved Highlander and I fell in love with Duncan MacLeod [Christopher Lambert],” says Lahme. “When I was cast in Metamorphosis I thought, ‘Oh, boy, I get to work with Christopher Lambert.’ He is so cute and down-to-Earth. I really haven’t had bad luck in my career so far. I always end up working with great people, thank goodness.”

Like all actors, whatever the part, Lahme wants her character to come across as believable. If she can achieve that, then it is a good day’s work for her. “When I watch myself onscreen, if I can feel it [the moment], if I get goosebumps, then I find that truly satisfying,” says the actress. “What I also enjoy about this job is that you can be anyone you ever wanted to, but cannot be in real life. That’s why I enjoyed modeling. I don’t want to wear fancy dresses all the time, but just for one day to take some nice pictures. Otherwise, I like to be comfortable. What I’m wearing right now, it’s casual, and that’s me. So being any character you want in front of the camera and playing her convincingly are the biggest [acting] rewards for me.”

Steve Eramo

Defying Gravity is produced by Fox Television Studios and OmniFilm Productions, in association with the BBC, Canada’s CTV and Germany’s ProSieben. As noted above, photos by Sergei Bachlakov or Kharen Hill and copyright of Fox Studios and ABC, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any kind. Thanks!

Eureka’s Erica Cerra And Niall Matter Guest-Star This Week On Warehouse 13

August 25, 2009

EUREKA‘s Erica Cerra (Deputy Jo Lupo) and Niall Matter (Zane Donovan) take a brief field trip from the technologically-advanced Pacific Northwest town when they guest-star this week on Warehouse 13. In Duped, Pete (Eddie McClintock) and Myka (Joanne Kelly) are dispatched to Las Vegas to retrieve an artifact that seems to grant good fortune to a couple of gamblers, Jillian Whitman (Cerra) and Gary Whitman (Matter). But their simple snag it, bag it, tag it mission gets complicated when Myka accidentally gets trapped in Lewis Carroll’s mirror – unleashing the malevolent entity that was trapped inside. Duped airs Tuesday, August 25th @ 9 p.m. EST/8 p.m. CT on The Syfy Channel.

Click the link below for a sneak preview of Duped – http://rcpt.yousendit.com/728091035/18f0355b601c54f6223f008d849ea5bb

Sneak Peek At This Week’s Ghost Hunters – 08 – 26 – 09

August 24, 2009
Grant Wilson and Jason Hawes, TV's Ghost Hunters. Photo copyright of The Syfy Channel

Grant Wilson and Jason Hawes, TV's Ghost Hunters. Photo copyright of The Syfy Channel

TUNE IN ALERT!! – In I Am Not Guilty, a Civil-War themed episode, the Ghost Hunters visit the historic Samuel Mudd House in Waldorf, Maryland, famous for being a pit stop for John Wilkes Booth on his escape route following the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Samuel Mudd met John Wilkes Booth six months before the assassination and let Booth stay in his home after tending to Booth’s broken leg following the assassination. Mudd’s involvement in the plot remains unclear, but he was found guilt of conspiracy and spent the rest of his life in prison. Now, several apparitions allegedly haunt the house (now operating as a museum), including a soldier and a woman in a white dress believed to be Samuel Mudd’s wife, Sarah.

Then, the team heads to Charles City, Virginia to visit the Edgewood Plantation, part of the ancestral home of U.S. Presidents William Henry and Benjamin Harrison, and site for the Confederate army during the Civil War. Today, it is officially a national- and state-regulated landmark as well as a hotbed of paranormal activity, including full-bodied apparitions.

Tune in as Jason, Grant and the rest of the team collect some of their most compelling thermal camera footage and electronic voice phenomena yet!

To get a sneak peak at this episode, check out the following link: 

https://rcpt.yousendit.com/728641695/cb8590115316941c343417eb461f9b77

As noted above, photo copyright of The Syfy Channel, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any form. Thanks!

Warehouse 13’s Eddie McClintock – For Pete’s Sake

August 23, 2009
Eddie McClintock as Secret Service Agent Pete Lattimer in Warehouse 13. Photo by Philippe Bosse and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Eddie McClintock as Secret Service Agent Pete Lattimer in Warehouse 13. Photo by Justin Stephens and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Are you familiar with the old adage, “No good deed goes unpunished?” Secret Service Agent Pete Lattimer certainly is. In the two-hour pilot for the new Syfy Channel series Warehouse 13, he and fellow agent Myka Bering thwart an attack on the Mexican ambassador’s daughter by a man possessed by a carved stone head known as the “Aztec Bloodstone.” When Pete fails to stop a thief, who takes the artifact and then disappears in front of the agent’s eyes in a flash of light, he is temporarily suspended pending an investigation.

The “thief” is, in fact Artie Nielsen, also a Secret Service agent and in charge of Warehouse 13, a top-secret government facility in South Dakota and home to objects, like the bloodstone, considered dangerous to the public. Much to Pete’s and Myka’s surprise, they are reassigned to help Artie track down and retrieve other artifacts. Their first assignment takes them to Iowa where a 15th century comb is wrecking havoc. Like his alter ego, Warehouse 13‘s Eddie McClintock, who plays Pete, will not soon forget his first day on the job.

“It was so freaking cold,” says McClintock laughing. “On the first day of filming it was around zero degrees and the entire crew was wearing Arctic gear, I’m not kidding you, and Joanne Kelly [Myka Bering] and I had to be dressed as though we were in Denver, Colorado on a balmy evening. I’m from Ohio, so I’m OK with the cold, but, man, this was so bad that every time they said, ‘Cut!’ Joanne and I would sprint inside just to get warm because our teeth were chattering. And as soon as they called, ‘Action,’ we’d have to stop our teeth from chattering.

“That’s the first thing that comes to mind about working on the pilot. The second thing that sticks out for me is thinking how incredibly fortunate I am to have such an amazing job. And then scene-wise, there was the ferret scene in the Warehouse where I’m standing there with Joanne, who is just fantastic, along with Saul Rubenik [Artie], whose body of work I have great respect for. The ridiculousness of me holding this ferret, which was basically up my nose for most of that scene, was just so surreal, and to be acting with Saul and Joanne was the icing on the cake. It’s one of those moments that remind me again how lucky I am to be able to do what I love, make money at it, and feed my family.”

Growing up in Ohio, McClintock was a keen wrestler, including in college where he studied design. “I thought for sure I’d end up being a graphic illustrator or designer,” notes the actor. “I always loved movies, though, and one of the major bonds I had with my dad was through films. He and I would go to the movies and then come home and recite all the lines. I was also a fan of the original Saturday Night Live cast – the Not Ready For Primetime Players – and imitating all those characters and skits, but I was never pushed in that direction as far as pursuing a career.

The cast of Warehouse 13 (L-R): Allison Scagliotti (Claudia Donovan), Saul Rubenik (Artie Nielsen), Joanne Kelly (Myka Bering), Genelle Williams (Leena) and Eddie McClintock (Pete Lattimer). Photo copyright of The Syfy Channel

The cast of Warehouse 13 (L-R): Allison Scagliotti (Claudia Donovan), Saul Rubenik (Artie Nielsen), Joanne Kelly (Myka Bering), Genelle Williams (Leena) and Eddie McClintock (Pete Lattimer). Photo copyright of The Syfy Channel

“After college I wanted to move to California, in particular, Los Angeles. My uncle owns an insurance company out there, so he asked me to come be a part of his company. However, he fired me after seven months, because I was useless as an insurance salesman. My heart wasn’t in it and he could tell. From there, I began working as a production assistant, and after three years I met some people from a small agency called LA Talent. They did a lot of commercial work, and with their help I wound up booking a series of Coors Light beer commercials. After that I decided, ‘I’m going to start taking [acting] classes.’ I did that for almost three years before ever going on my first audition because I knew that compared to other people I was incredibly green and didn’t want to blow any opportunities. My first national job was two lines on The Young and the Restless, and now here I am today.”

When it comes to McClintock’s role on Warehouse 13, the uninitiated might automatically assume that Pete Lattimer is just another in a long line of cookie-cutter government types. However, that was the further thing from the actor’s mind when it came time to audition.

“David Simkins[writer/executive producer] did a great job with the pilot script and I wanted to approach it a little differently,” he recalls. “With Pete being Secret Service, I figured everyone would come to the audition wearing black suits and ties, so I came in jeans and an old t-shirt and unshaven because I saw Pete as kind of down on his luck. He ends up basically getting fired from his job in the pilot because they think he stole an artifact, and I always try to find the comedy in something, even when it’s not necessarily written.

“So I read for David, and he told me later that I pretty much wasn’t even going to make it through to the next round of auditions. While my audition was entertaining, he hadn’t really seen my character that way. However, as the day went on, he thought, ‘That might be one way to do it.’ So he had me back for the network test and on that day I really tried to put a comedic bend on the material. Joanne [Kelly] and I read together, and she blew a line, so I made fun of her, and she [jokingly] punched me. Joanne was supposed to call me a ‘showboat,’ but it came out ‘showbot.’ Then I began doing the robot dance with a Michael Jackson flourish – this was before his passing, obviously.

“Joanne and I kind of forgot that we were singing for our supper and just had fun up there for a minute, which, I think, is pretty much what got us the job. Mark Stern [Executive Vice President of Original Programming at Syfy] remarked, ‘That’s the show right there. Those two doing what they were doing.’ I’ve said this before, but most actors, including me, are terrified to make a mistake when auditioning because you almost never get a second chance. So to actually be hired because of a mistake is ironic and interesting. It goes to show you that you’re allowed to make a mistake in the audition room. It’s how you then deal with it that could make all the difference.”

(L-R): Eddie McClintock, Joanne Kelly and Mark Stern. Photo copyright of The Syfy Channel

(L-R): Eddie McClintock, Joanne Kelly and Mark Stern. Photo copyright of The Syfy Channel

There was a bit of a gap between filming the Warehouse 13 pilot and the start of work on the show’s first season. As with all new roles, it took McClintock a little time to settle back into the groove of playing Agent Lattimer. “The greatest initial challenge for me with Pete was really not trying to figure out who he was, but, instead, just think, ‘I am Pete, Pete is me,’ and allow who I am to come out in my performance,” explains the actor.

“I’ve tried to make Pete who I am because it’s my desire to let everyone who’s watching know that a leading man can be funny and still be strong, loyal and heroic. Most TV programs don’t really let the hero show a silly side, and I guess it’s important to me to let people know that you can still have a good time and be competent at what you do. I appreciate, too, that our writers have made Pete a recovering alcoholic because it gives him more depth. It makes you go, ‘Wait a minute, this guy has issues.’ Guess what, people have issues, and some funny people tend to have the most issues because they use their comedy to deal with things. That’s there defense mechanism.”

Right from the start, the relationship between Pete Lattimer and Myka Bering is not unlike that of oil and water. He addresses a problem in a more off-the-cuff manner and using his gut instinct, while she prefers to employ a more serious, by-the-book approach. Like all good partnerships, they eventually come to realize that neither way is right or wrong, but that a balance of both is the best possible way to get the job done right.

“Certainly one of the biggest ways my character continues to grow is in his relationship with Myka,” says McClintock. “In the beginning, he didn’t understand Myka and really didn’t much care to. However, having now spent all this time with her, Pete has come to respect as well as care for her. He understands why she is the way she is, and he’s constantly trying to get her to be more like him. But I think Pete has learned not to push too hard and she, in turn, has warmed up and come around and kind of loosened up a bit. So that’s been a major change in my character – his willingness to accept Myka for who she is.”

One of Pete’s attributes that Myka has not quite come to share is his, and Artie’s, passion for cookies, preferably homemade. In the Warehouse 13 pilot, Artie entices Pete into the Warehouse with an offer of freshly baked cookies. “I think the whole cookie thing is great,” says McClintock with a laugh. “It’s kind of a happy mistake. I don’t know if we even planned on hitting on it that hard, but when, in the pilot, we got such a good reaction from Artie’s line, ‘I made cookies,’ and Pete’s, ‘Oooo…,’ that we decided to make my character a cookie lover. It just so happens that my wife and I are crazy about chocolate chip cookies, and every day when we get on the treadmill we ask each other, ‘Why do we like them so much?'”

Pete Lattimer in the Warehouse 13 episode "Magnetism." Photo by Philippe Bosse and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Pete Lattimer in the Warehouse 13 episode "Magnetism." Photo by Philippe Bosse and copyright of The Syfy Channel

In the season one Warehouse 13 episode Claudia, Artie is kidnapped by a young girl from his past, Claudia Donovan, who needs his help to re-create an experiment that she believes will bring her dead brother back to life. Their efforts are rewarded, and despite Claudia’s unconventional approach to procuring his assistance, Artie befriends her and invited Claudia to join his team. McClintock was happy to help his fellow cast and crew welcome actress Allison Scagliotti (Claudia) to the Warehouse family.

“Allison is great,” he says. “She’s sharp, sassy and young, so she brings new blood to the show, not to mention the whole geek-tech thing. And for totally selfish reasons, aside from the fact that Allison is terrific, she opens up a whole new demographic for the series, which brings in that many more viewers. I read on-line where people were talking about the fact that there’s going to be all these new Claudia icons after she did the Mr. Spock ‘Live Long and Prosper’ Vulcan salute [in the episode Burnout], and I’m thrilled about that. It means people are really buying into the show as well as the Claudia character and I couldn’t be happier.

“When you hear that they [the producers] are bringing someone new onto a show, you sometimes think, ‘Will it work? Will they fit in? We’ve got a good thing here; what if this person doesn’t make the cut?’ Frankly, not only has Allison made the cut, but she also adds to much so the series, especially in her relationship with Artie, which is fun to watch because they’re both amazingly good at what they do – the characters and the actors playing them.”

In their short time working with Artie, Pete and Myka have collected several artifacts including a Euphoria record (Resonance), capable of producing a song that immobilizes its listeners; James Braid’s chair (Magnetism), which causes those who sit in it to act out their subconscious desires; and a Native American buckskin coat (Elements) that allows its wearer to walk through solid objects. In the aforementioned Burnout, the agents race against the clock to find the Spine of the Saracen, which can turn its wearer into a killing machine capable of discharging massive amounts of electricity. When the Spine attaches itself to Pete, he must make the ultimate sacrifice in order to destroy it.

“There was a ton of exposition that I had to get out in the scene where Pete decides to commit suicide, or take a bullet as they say for the sake of the Warehouse, his country, his friends, the world,” says McClintock. “When I first read that scene it was pretty terrifying. I could just picture a giant ham sandwich,” chuckles the actor. “I thought, ‘Oh, my God, this could be so hammy if it’s not done correctly.’ So on the day of filming I said to our director, who is this amazing, guy, Constantine Makris, ‘Look, I have an idea of how this should be done.’ So he gave me free reign, and I was pleased with how it turned out. It’s probably the trickiest thing I’ve done so far acting-wise on the series.

Pete tries to figure out if Gilbert Radburn (James Naughton) is hiding something in "Elements." Photo by Philippe Bosse and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Pete tries to figure out if Gilbert Radburn (James Naughton) is hiding something in "Elements." Photo by Philippe Bosse and copyright of The Syfy Channel

“Not to sound artsy-fartsy or anything like that, but it was really freeing to be able to show that much emotion and be that connected to a scene. It’s kind of like running on a treadmill for six miles. When you’re done, you’re exhausted, but you feel exhilarated, and that’s why I do this [acting].”

Artie’s response to Pete’s predicament in Burnout gave viewers further insight into the relationship that is developing between both characters. “Pete’s father died when was very young, so I think he considers Artie to be his surrogate father, and Artie sees Pete as one of his kids,” says McClintock. “In Burnout, when Myka tells Artie and Claudia that the Spine was on Pete, you could tell it really hit them hard, and I like at the end of the episode where Pete is joking about how this mission really ‘killed him,’ and how Artie is truly concerned.

“There’s a wonderful family dynamic that our writers have set up and I’m so thrilled about that because it gives the show heart and makes it about a lot of different things. It’s not just about the silliness, or the artifacts, or Pete and Myka going off on a treasure hunt. In the end, it’s about a family trying in their own way to get by, and I’m so glad that the writers have given us that to play.”

Prior to Warehouse 13, McClintock was a regular in four other series, Holding the Baby, A.U.S.A., Stark Raving Mad and Crumbs. The actor has appeared in a number of made-for-TV movies and guest-starred on such shows as Friends, Felicity, House, Sex and the City, Spin City and Shark. Audience have also seen his work in recurring roles on Desperate Housewives and Bones.

“On Desperate Housewives I got to work with Eva Longoria [Gabrielle Solis] and Ricardo Chavira, who plays her husband [Carlos], and I have to tell you, he’s one of the nicest guys I’ve ever met,” says McClintock. “He was so nice to me that I was looking around thinking, ‘Am I being punked?’ Ricardo was just a really cool dude and Eva was terrific, too. So it was a positive experience and I had a ball. To be embraced by everyone who worked there meant a lot to me as well as my confidence as an actor.

“With Bones I finally got to meet David Boreanaz [Special Agent Seeley Booth], which was interesting because for the past few years I’d been saying that I was going to write a book called Living in the Shadow of Boreanaz,” jokes the actor. “At least twice a week someone would come up to me thinking I was David and ask for my autograph or want to talk about Buffy or Angel. I’ve always found it funny, and when I was on Bones, David said to me, ‘You do know who you look like, right? Craig Sheffer.’ That’s someone else who everyone used to think I looked like, and when I actually met Craig, he said, ‘Hey, dude, you look just like me.’ I said, ‘I know, and we both look like David Boreanaz.’ And Craig said,  ‘Yes, and Josh Brolin, too.’

“It was cool getting to work on Bones and I think it was also good preparation for Warehouse 13, although my character of Sully [Special Agent Tim Sullivan] wasn’t quite as loose as Pete is.”

Eddie McClintock visits The Big Apple. Photo by Heide Gutman and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Eddie McClintock visits The Big Apple. Photo by Heidi Gutman and copyright of The Syfy Channel

Although McClintock might work in an industry that is devoted to make-believe, the things that make his career rewarding for him as very much real. “I could lie and tell you that it’s not fun when I’m on a plane and the stewardess says, ‘Oh, my God, you’re the guy from Warehouse 13,’ and starts jumping up and down like a teenager. After 12 years, to have somebody recognize me for who I am and for my work, and not as David Boreanaz or Craig Sheffer, that’s rewarding, not to mention fun and exciting,” says the actor.

“Another rewarding thing is being able to give my wife and children the kind of life that I think a good husband and father should provide. Then there’s being able to work with people whose careers speak for themselves. I think, ‘Hey, I must be doing something right.’ I stood nose-to-nose in a scene with James Woods when I did an episode of Shark, and that was such a rush because he’s a brilliant actor as well as an icon. It’s also rewarding to have my manager, Ric Beddingfield – who took me on when I had nothing and had done nothing – stick with me. After all this time I’m able to show him that all his hard work has been for a good cause.

“This is an incredibly difficult business, and every once in a while it will let you take a small drink of success. At least that’s been my path. I’ve continued to work, but have never had a hit series. I’ve done five shows and ten pilots, so for the Syfy Channel to fly me to New York to help ring the closing bell at NASDAQ, that was surreal. And on Saturday [August 15th, 2009] I’m throwing out the pitch at the Tampa Bay Rays and Toronto Blue Jays game in front of something like 40,000 people. I’m terrified,” he laughs, “but it’s going to be awesome. There are so many rewards to what I’m doing, and hopefully I’ve kept in perspective the ones that truly matter, and then the ones that are just fun life experiences.”

Steve Eramo

As noted above, photos by Philippe Bosse, Heidi Gutman or Justin Stephens and copyright of The Syfy Channel, so please no unauthorized copying or duplicating of any kind. Thanks!